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PPLD    3,847
PPLD

Excerpt from:

Ask MichaelJuly 6, 2014Channel: Troy Tolley

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[ClaireC] Michael, could you tell us where horses are in the hierarchy of the animal kingdom and how their Animal-Companion bond with humans is affected by the fact that they are often "working" animals? Is it any different than trained, performing dogs or circus animals?

 

[MEntity] Though there is hierarchy of intelligence among most domestic or domesticated animals, there is very little difference emotionally. There are differences, but little. The range of intelligence only determines how that species can communicate its emotions, and how it organizes its experiences. This goes for chickens, cows, pigs, horses, birds, dogs, cats, etc. We are going to define "domesticated" as any of those species in captivity with which one can develop a relationship. There are many "pets" that fall outside of that, such as many reptiles or insects, and then there are some that fall outside of the category of "pets" that have evolved relationships with Humans, such as Bees.

 

[MEntity] What the individuals or groups within that domesticated species do only has bearing insofar as how it contributes to their experience of Emotional evolution. Those creatures that are nutured as a whole tend to evolve faster in their emotional intelligence than those that are not. For example, dogs, cats, and horses have keen emotional worlds that range across a wide spectrum of emotions, while chickens tend to suffer from extreme terror and displacement due to the mass suffering.

 

[MEntity] All non-sentient creatures tend to default to Instinctive methods for managing suffering and pain, and this is for the sake of protection against being seen as weak, vulnerable, etc. to other predators. Even the most intelligent of dogs, horses, cats, pigs, etc. will often refrain from reveal of pain or suffering for that reason.

 

[MEntity] Therefore, working horses who are treated well may feel a great sense of purpose and bonding, while other working horses relegated to strict uses, such as carriage horses or race horses, suffer greatly, even if not in obvious ways.

 

[MEntity] Care and feeding are not all that are necessary for the quality of life for the more emotionally-complex creatures. The more social the species, the more likely the suffering is reduced to strict work and use.

 

[MEntity] Watching horses running freely in a field together versus watching a horse chained to a cart alongside Central Park is all that is necessary to know this, if one is practicing empathy.

 

[ClaireC] "Beast of burden" comes to mind.

 

[MEntity] We wish to be clear that the differentiation between suffering and pain is a matter of time. More emotionally-complex and intelligent creatures can suffer more easily than those that are not. However, the more a creature is exposed to pain, the more it can suffer, even as there is no sense of time. So while a horse or a dog can suffer even when between painful experiences, a chicken that is trapped in terror with injuries and a mutated body is in a constant state of pain, which is its own form of suffering.

 

[MEntity] Animals used for performance, entertainment, circuses, and work often do suffer because most of these scenarios override everything natural to that creature.

 

[MEntity] In cases where work is balanced with care, feeding, shelter, socializing, freedom, expression, and affection can there be the possibility of a "happy" creature.

 

[MEntity] This is true of even Humans

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AnnaD    2,284
AnnaD

this is hard to read and I flinch reading it. Thank you ClaireC. This confirms what I knew.

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