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  • Sex Education

    Janet

    [Excerpt from Michael Speaks: November 2013]

     

    [ViP1]
    Sex education for children is something that seems particularly important in order for children to know how to manage their impulses with respect for themselves as they become older, and yet it is approached in wildly varying, ad hoc ways that typically depend heavily on cultural background.

     

    Such approaches range from no intentional attempt at sex education at all, rather avoiding the topic completely, to complete openness that might strike other people as awkward and inappropriate.

     

    The education itself might come from parents, or from teachers, or from friends, or from the media, or all of those. In addition, there is usually some degree of awkwardness in parents around even raising the topic with their children to begin with.

     

    Do you have any insights on how to approach sex education for children, irrespective of their cultural background, in a manner that is inclusive of their own makeup, that is appropriate to and respectful of their needs and level of mental/emotional development, the best age for children at which to introduce it, and who such education might best be provided by?

     

    [MEntity]
    The greatest approach to sex education is through the removal of shame from the equation. The rest is fairly moot. Shame is easily learned, and this informs one more so than any other guiding factor for health.

     

    We say that the rest is fairly moot because most education for children regarding a topic that cannot be fathomed is difficult to instill in any meaningful way, and for those in the throes of it simply cannot hear. "Education" would be most effective in removing shame, and inviting choice.

     

    By inviting choice we mean that children would do well to know that they have a choice for being safe, asking for more information, accessing protection, etc. For some, the details are helpful, for others the details are meaningless, but for the entire spectrum of ages and cultures, CHOICE is what is often missing from the equation of education.

     

    "You do not have to understand what you are doing, just that you have a choice in how you are doing it."

     

    Once the power of choice is in a child's hand from any culture, and the weight of shame is removed, the eagerness for "better choices" comes naturally.

     

    In short: reduce shame, increase choice. This can be implemented in any number of ways.


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