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    Janet

    [Excerpt from Michael Speaks: October 2012]

     

    Janet: My attitude is Stoic and I have found little documentation -- only generalities -- as to what this attitude entails. (For example: “sees life as if they have seen it all before”.) Most of the references to Stoic that I've found are in association with those who are Spiritualist and need to use the positive pole of Stoic to get out of negative pole of Spiritualist. For the benefit of all of us Stoics, can you perhaps provide little more info about this attitude? Are there identifiable degrees between the positive and negative poles?

     

    MEntity:
    Janet, the Stoic is one who interprets life in terms of behavior and character vs claims and descriptions. Character and behavior must take priority over other facets of interpretation. For instance, it will not matter what one says, but what one does, who one IS.

     

    The Stoic explores the world of ethics as sustained and nurtured through self-management, self-awareness, self-control. This realm of ethic evolves from being standardized in the younger Soul Ages to being highly individualized by the Old Soul Age, with nuances granted.

     

    We have described the Stoic as "one who sees the world as if it has been seen before" because the Stoic uses one's "nature" as the defining force against which to measure ethics and authenticity. This nature is a constant, even if individualized. In short, the older Soul Stoic might simply see the world in terms of how true one is to oneself.

     

    And "oneself" is one's nature, and this is fairly constant, if not completely constant. It can be built upon, evolved, expanded, destroyed, crippled, wounded, but it is a constant that is fairly easy to discern by the Stoic.

     

    The Stoic interprets life with a spectrum of understanding that one's nature is naturally limiting, that one's environment is naturally constricting, that one's upbringing has its effects, and so on, and that all of these things contribute to the character and behavior of a person in a way that is somewhat deterministic. That a person is the way he is because that is what he has to work with.

     

    Janet: I assume the Stoic applies this yardstick both to herself and to others.

     

    MEntity:
    In the Positive Pole, Tranquility, the Stoic is not disappointed, not disoriented, and not reactionary to the ups and downs of life, or the behavior and choices of others. This Stoic does not see these as "good" or "bad" things, but as symptoms of the nature of someone or something. This Stoic works with that.

     

    As this is an Ordinal, Inspirational Attitude, it can see itself in anyone around, as Inspiration is merely reflection of potential used for benefit.

     

    The Negative Pole Stoic has moved into Resignation and no longer bothers with the nuances and potential, but determines that everyone is the same, or potentially the same, and that there is no use or hope in seeing anything differently.

     

    And, yes, this is both internal and external, Janet.

     

    None of this is to say that a Stoic is not expressive or that she does not wish for more, have opinions, experience expectations, because there are several elements at play in a Personality, but the older Stoic in the Positive Pole WILL tend to aim for that recognition of the nature of a person or situation over the expectations and demands of that person or situation, while the older Stoic in the Negative Pole will tend to dismiss any effort to consider beyond a conclusion drawn.

     

    Do you relate?

     

    Janet: Yes. Very much so.

    Edited by Janet


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