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Troy

NEWS: Backlog, Schedule, and The Future

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Juni

"All my coworkers are dead people" LOL.
Seriously, I have found vitamins B and D make a huge difference in my energy level and well-being, too. My neurologist prescribed the former to help with my migraines and I really notice if I forget it.
Kudos on exercise and dietary changes too!
I hope you are continuing to throw off that cold and that your dad is stabilizing as well.

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Uma

So good to hear you are on the mend and feeling better. What's with you and Warren Buffet and Coke? I'm sure if you replace the Coke with good, even alkaline water, you'll feel the difference a lot. SENDING love and good vibes to you and to your Dad. Hope he is improving too.

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Crystal

Troy - I'm glad to hear you are feeling better! I hope things continue on an upward trajectory for you.

 

Vitamin D - I was tested and was very very very deficient, despite living in California! My doctor gave me these megadose pills - 50,000 units - and that made a big difference. I didn't know how run down I was feeling until I got my levels back up! I also take a B supplement, from Garden of Life, which is all natural and food based. I get all my vitamins from Garden of Life or New Chapter or Jarrow, because I think the organic kind are vastly better for you and better absorbed, especially when it comes to B complex.

 

I hope you don't have diabetes! Though the good news is that for Type II, diet and exercise often does the job in controlling it; not everyone needs medication.

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DianeHB

So glad to hear you're figuring out your health issues. I'm positive that if you quit drinking Coke (just don't replace it with another sugary drink), your weight will drop naturally and diabetes won't be an issue. You might want to minimize refined flours and sugars to help it along. 

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Guest Matt

Just make sure your using methylated form of b complex that has methyl b12, and folinic acid, or 5-mthf, and not folic acid, as folic acid is synthetic, and can build up if your not converting it well. The methylated forms are far superior to the synthetics they sell in your normal grocery store. My favorite b is a b complex from biotics. Have to order it online. Its my favorite because it doesnt have extreme doses in it, but it has enough to replenish a deficiency. 

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ckaricai
2 hours ago, DianeHB said:

So glad to hear you're figuring out your health issues. I'm positive that if you quit drinking Coke (just don't replace it with another sugary drink), your weight will drop naturally and diabetes won't be an issue. You might want to minimize refined flours and sugars to help it along. 

 

I know you mean well here, but I think as far as diabetes is concerned that it might be best to refrain from health advice if only because everyone who has it is affected differently by well, everything. You wouldn't want to set someone up for a positive outcome, have them do everything that is supposed to give them that outcome, then have to deal with the frustration of having it not work. Even if you were diabetic and this approach worked for you, it might not work for another person. You could find a solution to keep your numbers low or consistent and have it work for day, weeks, months or years and then suddenly it stops working. And you have to start all over. That's just how diabetes is. If Troy is diagnosed he will have to try a number of approaches before finding out what will work for him. There are lots of people who do lose weight and manage to still have high numbers. Or who exercise and eat right and still don't lose much weight at all. Other factors like stress and other health issues also affect bs numbers. Sorry to say, but It's just not the kind of disease where eating clean will make all your problems go away. 

Edited by ckaricai

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DianeHB

@ckaricai Actually, that was not a random health suggestion to a stranger but a friendly encouragement to someone whose history I'm familiar with on a subject I've studied. It's well established that type 2 diabetes is caused by fat in the muscle tissues and blood stream creating resistance to insulin, and that animal protein is a major contributing factor. (So is eating too much oil, but I was only intent on encouraging what Troy already knew.)  A lot of people, including doctors and nutritionists, think that "clean eating" includes animal protein. Since I know that Troy doesn't eat animal products and I know what his diet is like from seeing his cooking on FB, animal protein is not an issue for him. Sugar is. I also know he wasn't always this heavy, so he can get back there again, especially if he quits drinking extra calories which increases caloric intake without satiation. Making this comment to someone I know is not the same as saying it to some random overweight person with diabetes. 

 

This site has a lot of links to the research on what I'm talking about:

https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/diabetes/.

Edited by DianeHB
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Stickyflames

Gotta get that B! All my love to you baby sugar!

Kicking coke to the curb is the way to go! You are worth it!

Gosh, i am probably depleted in D too. This week has marked the first time in tree years i took in an animal product...found out my D supplements had bovine bones in them and had a spoonful of my roommates kimchi , of which i spat out after the fishy taste...bleeeeeeech. There must be a vegan vitamin D out there, i will go hunting this week. Glad you are feeling better! So glad!

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ckaricai
1 hour ago, DianeHB said:

@ckaricai Actually, that was not a random health suggestion to a stranger but a friendly encouragement to someone whose history I'm familiar with on a subject I've studied. It's well established that type 2 diabetes is caused by fat in the muscle tissues and blood stream creating resistance to insulin, and that animal protein is a major contributing factor. (So is eating too much oil, but I was only intent on encouraging what Troy already knew.)  A lot of people, including doctors and nutritionists, think that "clean eating" includes animal protein. Since I know that Troy doesn't eat animal products and I know what his diet is like from seeing his cooking on FB, animal protein is not an issue for him. Sugar is. I also know he wasn't always this heavy, so he can get back there again, especially if he quits drinking extra calories which increases caloric intake without satiation. Making this comment to someone I know is not the same as saying it to some random overweight person with diabetes. 

 

This site has a lot of links to the research on what I'm talking about:

https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/diabetes/.

 

Diane, this site isn't saying anything new to me. With all due respect what I said still stands. I was including not eating meat as part of "clean eating." My larger point is to be more open about what will work and what won't and to not suggest something as The Solution even if you know what someone eats. You can't really generalize with diabetes, sorry but that's just the reality of it. Every body is different. I know it sounds counterintuitive, but you don't know that quitting sugar will make it not be an issue unless that actually happens. It might help a little or it might help a lot or not at all. Giving suggestions is fine but keep in mind that they are suggestions, and not guaranteed solutions, especially  when it comes to health. That's all I'm saying. 

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DianeHB

@ckaricai Fair enough, I should've said "diabetes would probably not be an issue for you". I actually meant that reducing sugar would help him lose the weight (and that it is the primary cause of his weight gain) rather than that it is a cause of his potential diabetes. 

Edited by DianeHB
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Troy

@DianeHB and @ckaricai thanks for the input! I am headed off for my Diabetes screening today, so we will soon find out! I hear where both of you are coming from because what Diane says about what to consider altering is absolutely true, and what Cary says about being flexible about what works for you is absolutely true. I don't see a conflict between the two suggestions, so that works for me.

 

Considering my diet, my greatest ingestion of sugar was through Coke. I drank a LOT of Coke. I could drink more than 2 Litres a day. Other than that, I hardly ever ate anything with refined sugar or with lots of sugar. But... that is a LOT of daily sugar and I'm not even a fan of sweets!

 

When I got word of the horrors my Dad is enduring because of Diabetes, as well as word from my Doctor that I may be on the brink of Diabetes, I cut out Coke immediately.

 

I love Coke, but (mostly) not because of the sugar. And definitely not because of the caffeine, which has very little effect on me. It's because of the "bite," the carbonation. So it is pretty easy to find alternatives. I like seltzer, but they make them all fruit flavored or plain, so they aren't as appealing to me, but I like them. I also love ice water because the biting cold is as satisfying as carbonation. I've found some satisfying alternatives like GUS (grown up soda) and White Label Yerba Mate Soda, but these still have cane sugar, though unrefined. They are better than Coke, but I found something even better... What is working for me is SAP! It is carbonated Maple Water! That's it!

 

http://sapmaplewater.com/

• single ingredient - 100% pure maple sap
• 90 calories
• 16g sugar
• low-glycemic sugar
• not remixed
• organic
• non-GMO
• kosher
• gluten free
• vitamins, minerals, and nutrients
• antioxidants
• electrolytes
• prebiotics
• polyphenols

 

So between SAP! and straight up ice water, I've not missed Coke.

 

I have been devouring information on diabetic diets and management and reversal, and I discovered my diet is regularly described as optimal for anyone who has diabetes! A vegan diet is consistently mentioned as beneficial in every way. I can only guess that what contributed to my potentially activating diabetes would be my sedentary/overweight status, all of that Coke I was ingesting, and I do use oil, though I thought I was using only "healthy" oils. Oh... and I eat a LOT of potatoes. Apparently potatoes aren't so great for diabetes? Cutting out Coke is easy, but potatoes?? I don't know if I can do that!

 

For me, I think cutting out Coke and increasing my activity are really the main things I can do better, and they are so important in general, with or without diabetes, so I'm doing them.

 

Wish me luck.... I'll find out today. No matter what, this scare is a nice kick in the butt to improve on a few areas of life that needed more care.

 

 

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Diane

Good Luck with your appointment.  I think Maple syrup is a great alternative to sugar.  I have inflammatory illnesses and when I cut sugar from my diet my inflammation greatly improved.  I use a small amount of maple syrup in decaf coffee, only one cup a day.

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KurtisM

Hope you kick that backlog in the butt Troy. ;)

I'll look forward to the Ask M and Michael Speaks about Body Types come May. For the former, I'm gonna ask about the Shame of Talents if I can attend.

 

Also on the current topic of Diabetes. Since you don't have Lunar I'd guess it would take a bit for your body to develop diabetes.

I'm not saying no one can if they don't have Lunar. But if I had to guess it would likely come after the primary health type falls into its -Pole. Makes me wonder how the body circulates problems around the glands.

I trust all will go well. I've never heard about potatoes being a factor in blood sugar. Hah.

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Bobby

@Troy, I don't know how you normally eat your potatoes but I know people that like them typically eat them fried and pan fried at that.  A great substitute for any sort of fried potato is radish.  Pan fried radishes taste just like potatoes but with almost none of the starch.  If you do try them, pan frying them in something like a little bit of coconut oil makes them even healthier as opposed to a higher Omega 6 fatty oil that is typically used for frying such as soy, peanut, or canola.  Basically avoid the seed oils.

 

100 grams of white potato has 17grams of carbohydrate

100 grams of raddish has 3.4 grams of carbohydrate.

 

Remember, carbohydrates whether they come from a coke or from a potato get converted to glucose in the blood and have the same effect no matter the source.  So the lower the carbohydrate count, the lower your blood glucose will be and the less stress placed upon your pancreas and insulin production.  Less insulin means less chance for fat storage.

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Troy
2 hours ago, Bobby said:

Remember, carbohydrates whether they come from a coke or from a potato get converted to glucose in the blood and have the same effect no matter the source.  So the lower the carbohydrate count, the lower your blood glucose will be and the less stress placed upon your pancreas and insulin production.  Less insulin means less chance for fat storage.

1

 

Do you mean low BAD carbs, like refined carbs? This low-carb fad is so confusing to me based on all that I have read, especially since reading up on diabetes and how carbohydrates, sugars, and fibers work in our diet.

 

We need carbohydrates. They are good for us. A high-carb vegan diet is one of the healthiest diets there is. Even a person with diabetes can benefit more from healthy carbohydrates in a healthy diet over just aiming for low carbs all around. The scientific evidence actually shows us that a mindful higher carbohydrate diet is more effective in every area of life from health to athletic performance to fat loss. 

 

I like this excerpt from Green Planet with an article about the low vs high carb controversy.

 

Look at Carbs Through a Different Light

How about we get rid of the low carb vs. high carb dichotomy that’s destroying our plans of eating healthy and protecting the planet? Instead of looking at carbs like they’re the enemy, why not eat a diet that’s high in good carbs and low in bad carbs? Think of is this way: whether you’re paleo, vegan, or somewhere in between, potato chips, white bread, and other processed junk foods don’t belong on any healthy eating plan.


Carbohydrates are essential to any diet.

 

Say goodbye to those refined carbs and opt for whole grains, vegetables, fruits, beans, legumes, nuts, and seeds. You need complex carbs to provide energy, help aid digestion, aid in mental focus, balance the nervous system and help with several other functions.

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Bobby

@Troy I was simply offering a manageable substitute based upon what you yourself said

 

Oh... and I eat a LOT of potatoes. Apparently potatoes aren't so great for diabetes? Cutting out Coke is easy, but potatoes?? I don't know if I can do that!

 

You admitted they were not healthy for "you" because of your current situation.  So what better solution than to have your potato and eat it too by giving radishes a try as a healthier substitute instead? :)

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Troy
1 minute ago, Bobby said:

@Troy I was simply offering a manageable substitute based upon what you yourself said

 

Oh... and I eat a LOT of potatoes. Apparently potatoes aren't so great for diabetes? Cutting out Coke is easy, but potatoes?? I don't know if I can do that!

 

You admitted they were not healthy for "you" because of your current situation.  So what better solution than to have your potato and eat it too by giving radishes a try as a healthier substitute instead? :)

 

LOL, no no no... I wasn't referring to that. I love this idea! And I didn't "admit" anything. I was expressing my confusion over it. Of all things, my poor potato gets a bad rap! I was wondering why they are so "bad" for us and in particular for diabetes. I haven't really explored the why of concern for potatoes.  

 

Anyway, on this specific thing about radishes, I *love* your idea and am already planning to do it! 

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AnnaD

http://www.glycemicindex.com/

 

 

(from Wikipedia)

The glycemic index or glycaemic index (GI) is a number associated with a particular type of food that indicates the food's effect on a person's blood glucose (also called blood sugar) level. A value of 100 represents the standard, an equivalent amount of pure glucose.[1]

The GI represents the rise in a person's blood sugar level two hours after consumption of the food. The glycemic effect of foods depends on a number of factors, such as the type of starch, physical entrapment of the starch molecules within the food, fat and protein content of the food and organic acids or their salts in the meal. The GI is useful for understanding how the body breaks down carbohydrates[2] and only takes into account the available carbohydrate (total carbohydrate minus fiber) in a food.

The glycemic index is usually applied in the context of the quantity of the food and the amount of carbohydrate in the food that is actually consumed. A related measure, the glycemic load (GL),[3] factors this in by multiplying the glycemic index of the food in question by the carbohydrate content of the actual serving. Watermelon has a high glycemic index, but a low glycemic load for the quantity typically consumed.[4] Fructose, by contrast, has a low glycemic index, but can have a high glycemic load if a large quantity is consumed.

GI tables are available that list many types of foods and their GIs. Some tables also include the serving size and the glycemic load of the food per serving.[2]

Graph describing the rise of blood sugar after meals.

A practical limitation of the glycemic index is that it does not measure insulin production due to rises in blood sugar. As a result, two foods could have the same glycemic index, but produce different amounts of insulin. Likewise, two foods could have the same glycemic load, but cause different insulin responses. Furthermore, both the glycemic index and glycemic load measurements are defined by the carbohydrate content of food. For example, when eating steak, which has no carbohydrate content but provides a high protein intake, up to 50% of that protein can be converted to glucose when there is little to no carbohydrate consumed with it.[5] But because it contains no carbohydrate itself, steak cannot have a glycemic index. For some food comparisons, the "insulin index" may be more useful.

Edited by AnnaD
poor referencing.
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Bobby

@Troy I wouldn't say potatoes are "bad" per se but they do spike blood sugar because of the high carbohydate count that they contain.  Some people can handle that better than others.  Regardless, when you ingest something with that many carbohydrates or any for that matter, they get converted to glucose through the process of being metabolized.  Glucose can only be within a certain range to be considered healthy.  Too high or too low and you can actually die but you'd have to have a pretty major disorder for that to happen.  I think I've read that normally we have about a table spoon of sugar equivalent in glucose flowing through our bloodstream at any given time.  Any more than that and the pancreas goes to work pumping out insulin which promotes the cells of the body to uptake the glucose.  When they've had their fill and can't take anymore because they don't need it and can't store it, the remaining glucose gets shunted to the fat cells.  One way or another, it will come out of the blood stream.  Otherwise, you'd go into a diabetic coma.  Over time from consuming very high concentrations of carbohydrates, your pancrease is so over worked trying to do it's job of removing the glucose that it just wears out.  This would be type1 diabetes.  Or, your cells become insulin resistant and no matter what amount of insulin has been produce to help in the uptake of glucose, they refuse it.  And if that happens, the only recourse as mentioned before is fat storage and weight gain.  The body is an amazing machine I think and there is a method to the madness.  You're always better off not going on the rollercoaster high and then low glucose cycles.  Once you'r body has done it's job after a high glucose rush and then followed by its removal, you will experience "the crash" and hunger again soon after that.  Consuming food that keeps that cycle mostly stable will help prevent this.  As you've said, this can be done on a vegetarian/vegan way of eating.  You simply opt for the lower carbohydrate vegetables.  Ironically, or not, they just happen to be the green ones or the ones I doubt anyone could argue that are the most healthy and nutritious.

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Troy

Thanks, @Bobby I was just reading up on this as you posted about it. I was reading that potatoes are a good carb and only a bad carb if you have diabetes, precisely for the reasons you described. I understand now. Lord help me if I have diabetes because the potato is my favorite food on the planet!! Luckily, I LOVE Radishes, too! And I know Cauliflower can be used in place of potatoes, too.

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Bobby
Just now, Troy said:

Thanks, @Bobby I was just reading up on this as you posted about it. I was reading that potatoes are a good carb and only a bad carb if you have diabetes, precisely for the reasons you described. I understand now. Lord help me if I have diabetes because potato is my favorite food on the planet!!

 

LOL

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Sarah

@Troy, have you ever looked into Dr. McDougall's diet and books? He advocates a low-fat vegan diet, and actually includes lots of starches (even for diabetes). His story is interesting. He ate so badly as a young man that he actually had a stroke!

 

I only seem to have a problem with carbs if I eat them with too much fat. Did that last night, and my blood sugar crashed a few hours after dinner. According to McDougall, fats reduce your insulin sensitivity, while sugars raise it. Here's a little article where he explains some of this.

 

@Stickyflames, yes, there is vegan vitamin D. But it usually comes in the form of vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol), which doesn't work as well. A lot of vitamin D3 supplements are made from lanolin (which might be acceptable for less strict vegetarians). There's apparently a new brand out there that's made from lichen, which would be suitable for vegans. I think it's called Vitashine.

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