Jump to content
Troy

NEWS: Backlog, Schedule, and The Future

Recommended Posts

Troy

@Sarah you nailed it! This video goes over that very thing in a succinct and friendly way!

 

 

  • LIKE/LOVE 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sarah

Thanks for the video, @Troy! I have a friend who might benefit from that information. I need to send it her way!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Janet
2 hours ago, Troy said:

And I know Cauliflower can be used in place of potatoes, too.

My Hello Fresh meal tonight had me boil potatoes and cauliflower (in equal amounts) and mash them together. I'd never considered this before. I avoid cauliflower because I find it absolutely tasteless with no redeeming texture, but it occurred to me that potatoes also don't have a lot of flavor on their own -- it's what you mix into them (or add on top of them) that brings the delight. I'd definitely do mashed potatoes/cauliflower again. 

  • LIKE/LOVE 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AnnaD
4 hours ago, Troy said:

Look at Carbs Through a Different Light

How about we get rid of the low carb vs. high carb dichotomy that’s destroying our plans of eating healthy and protecting the planet? Instead of looking at carbs like they’re the enemy, why not eat a diet that’s high in good carbs and low in bad carbs? Think of is this way: whether you’re paleo, vegan, or somewhere in between, potato chips, white bread, and other processed junk foods don’t belong on any healthy eating plan.


Carbohydrates are essential to any diet.

 

Say goodbye to those refined carbs and opt for whole grains, vegetables, fruits, beans, legumes, nuts, and seeds. You need complex carbs to provide energy, help aid digestion, aid in mental focus, balance the nervous system and help with several other functions.

 

 

I have found that the information that comes out of the US to be so unaligned with glycaemic index (Dr Jenny Brand Miller University of Sydney) information. There is such a huge amount of ignorance being propagated about good carbs and bad carbs, like carbs must be avoided at all costs. Only refined carbs need to be avoided, as the high glycemic carbs in them swing ones blood glucose to peaks and troughs which are inefficient uses of sugar. You can be vegan and have wholefood, balanced, low glycaemic index meals, which keeps your blood sugar levels in a stable zone, due to the carbohydrates requiring more time to mechanically and chemically digest to release the sugar and store it. What you have said above Troy, sums up my experiences and convictions in eating as unprocessed and whole foods as possible. The level of processing, distance from natural foods, and manufacture of Frankenstein foods in US food, is unreal, as is the level of scapegoating of carbs as evil. I seriously believe the propaganda of carbs as the root of all evil is coming from the Meat and Dairy industries as a tactic to keep us eating meat and dairy.

  • LIKE/LOVE 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby
2 hours ago, Janet said:

My Hello Fresh meal tonight had me boil potatoes and cauliflower (in equal amounts) and mash them together. I'd never considered this before. I avoid cauliflower because I find it absolutely tasteless with no redeeming texture, but it occurred to me that potatoes also don't have a lot of flavor on their own -- it's what you mix into them (or add on top of them) that brings the delight. I'd definitely do mashed potatoes/cauliflower again. 

 

Oh Janet, yes, there is a dish called "fauxtatoes" where instead of potatoes, you simply do the recipe with cauliflower.  I personally don't see much difference in taste by the time you add the usuals to mashed potatoes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troy
9 hours ago, AnnaD said:

I seriously believe the propaganda of carbs as the root of all evil is coming from the Meat and Dairy industries as a tactic to keep us eating meat and dairy.

 

 

You are so right. Putting the Meat & Dairy Council in charge of health education has damaged and brainwashed many generations of people. Now that we have the truth about how unhealthy and unsustainable a carnivorous diet is, that truth is constantly tossed aside or twisted and they play on people's addiction to convenience, familiarity, and any reason to justify not giving up animal flesh.

 

There is so much confusing information out there so I don't blame anyone for being confused, but here's the thing:

 

If anyone is confused about what diet is healthy and sustainable and aligned with our best well-being and peace, all you have to do is look at the macrocosmic health of the planet and its people. A carnivorous diet is one of the primary causes for our planet being extremely sick. If a "personal" diet has caused an entire planet to be so sick, it can't possibly be good for us. And it's not just about HOW that diet is sustained, it's that it is truly unsustainable and destructive. There are so many systemically destructive consequences of a carnivorous diet that it can't possibly be justified as "healthy." Compare that to the widespread and immediate relief and benefit of a vegan diet for the planet, for its forests, rivers, oceans, and even for starving populations, let alone its cascading benefits for our personal health, it seems the choice shouldn't be confusing.

  • LIKE/LOVE 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bobby

Well, I just want to make one thing perfectly clear since it seems anytime it's brought up that it's an attempt to lure someone to eating meat.  I KNOW you're Vegan so in my recommendation to go with lower carb vegetables would have been in that vein.  I was by no means implying that you or anyone else should be a meat eater to accomplish that.  In my studies, eating lower carbs makes sense to me based upon their effects on the body whether you eat meat or you don't.

  • LIKE/LOVE 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troy
1 hour ago, Bobby said:

Well, I just want to make one thing perfectly clear since it seems anytime it's brought up that it's an attempt to lure someone to eating meat.  I KNOW you're Vegan so in my recommendation to go with lower carb vegetables would have been in that vein.  I was by no means implying that you or anyone else should be a meat eater to accomplish that.  In my studies, eating lower carbs makes sense to me based upon their effects on the body whether you eat meat or you don't.

 

 

Oh my goodness, I know you aren't trying to lure me back to eating animals. LOL

 

When we talk about things and share opinions here, my mind goes directly to the SUBJECT, not to the person talking about the subject. If I get messy with that and sound like I'm attacking you or hurting your feelings, please let me know.

 

So back to the topic: We are talking about the misinformation and confusion out there propagated by the meat industry or biased "science" that justifies eating animals, in general. The whole "carbs are bad for you" thing comes out of that. It seems to be very America-centric to teach this idea that carbs are bad for you and that there is no other factor to consider like complex carbohydrates, the amount of fiber in your diet, etc. that all works holistically, and not isolated. This idea to avoid carbs in general seems to come out of and be promoted by diets that justify continuing a diet full of animal products. 

  • LIKE/LOVE 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maureen

I wanted to clear some communication up I've been noticing on this thread. I've studied food and diet for years (actually both Diane and I have -- books, seminars, doctors) going back to my 20's as my mother was what I consider a "health food" pioneer without even knowing it at the time. I eat well and I'm healthy. I don't add anything to the communication mix on "diet" because frankly I may disagree with some of you and I'm tired of it as a subject -- but then that's my "beef".  ?

 

I just wanted to add that when I see people using the term "carbs" or "low carbs" or "reduced carbs" I generally assume they mean refined carbs. It's just a short form these days. I assume (maybe I shouldn't) that if people are talking about diet and health in general they know the difference between the (refined) "carbs" in soft drinks or potato chips that aren't so good for you ("empty calories" = (usually) high in calories and no nutritional value), especially in large quantities, vs the (complex) "carbs" in a bunch of asparagus and all the other lovely vegetables that contain healthy carbs. This knowledge of "refined carbs" shortened to "carbs" has been on the table (I know it's punny ?) for as far back as I remember. It's not new.

 

Diet is a personal thing -- very personal. If people want to shorten their lives by eating too many (refined) "carbs"  that's their choice. Or perhaps it is more of a "belief thing" (as Seth talks about) and depending on how one thinks about the food they eat they may end up living the longest. Who knows ...and who am I to say any different. The bottom line is people can eat anything they want, no matter what we think about what they may want to eat, and it will always be their choice. Choice is what we are here to learn about -- isn't it? It's OK to know what's best for you but lets' stop being so arrogant about the food choices of others. Frankly, it's none of our business what other people eat and just because some people choose to remain quiet on the subject doesn't mean they don't have an informed, enlightened opinion of their own -- even though it may be different from what we, or others, think or believe.

Edited by Maureen
  • LIKE/LOVE 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Martha

I had no vit D either when tested a few years ago. One trick is to take 10k with the meal with the most fat, anecdotal but my PA said she'd really noticed that people who did that seemed to feel better. And the other PA wants my pre diabetic ass to give up sugar completely (Coke here too!), but with the layoff and other shit the past few months I just can't deal. My a1c has been just fine at every test so yay. I've got diabetes on both sides so hoping that once I can exercise more reliably I can go back to losing weight. At this point you can have my Mexican Coke when you pry it from my cold dead hands. 

  • LIKE/LOVE 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troy
22 hours ago, Maureen said:

Diet is a personal thing -- very personal. 

 

To a very minimal extent it is personal, but mostly it's not a personal thing. Kind of like smoking or driving drunk or voting or religious beliefs. Sure, you can say those things are very personal choices, but they have huge consequences that cascade out from that choice and force others to deal with the suffering caused by it.

 

I love you (all) and I hope you never get frustrated or annoyed with me or feel attacked when I speak in favor of more compassionate and healthy choices with beneficial impact for everyone over massive collateral damage to everything regarding diet. 

 

When we we step back and realize diet isn't the personal thing we've been taught to think it is, like smoking, driving drunk, our votes, and religion, we can start considering its very real consequences on more than just ourselves. 

  • LIKE/LOVE 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troy
22 hours ago, Maureen said:

I just wanted to add that when I see people using the term "carbs" or "low carbs" or "reduced carbs" I generally assume they mean refined carbs. It's just a short form these days. I assume (maybe I shouldn't) that if people are talking about diet and health in general they know the difference between the (refined) "carbs" in soft drinks or potato chips that aren't so good for you ("empty calories" = (usually) high in calories and no nutritional value), especially in large quantities, vs the (complex) "carbs" in a bunch of asparagus and all the other lovely vegetables that contain healthy carbs. This knowledge of "refined carbs" shortened to "carbs" has been on the table (I know it's punny ?) for as far back as I remember. It's not new.

 

In my devouring of information there has been no generally implicit recognition of carbs as meaning some are good and some are bad. The carnivorous information really pushes the whole "every carb is bad" idea. Much of the carnivorous diet information was clearly about all carbs, and they encourage people to increase meat and dairy intake. They don't differentiate at all. Regardless, I would have a hard time trusting any information that doesn't differentiate or presumes that people know the difference. 

 

The only sources that differentiate and clarify and explain how carbs really work were those of vegetarian and vegan sources. I guess because the vegan diet has been so misunderstood and scoffed at for so long, and because so many of the younger generation are recognizing the necessity for changing our cruel and destructive habits, the good sources really have to have their information clear, concise, and referenced. 

 

There is bad and sloppy information all around on this subject, but I consistently saw meat eaters lumping all carbs together, which is deliberate misinformation at worst or irresponsible at best.

 

I'm just glad the world is changing. Too slowly, but it's changing. We always end up on the right side of history. The vegan diet is now mainstream and acceptable and the benefits are indisputable for our health, our environment, our climate, our fellow Earthlings, our sharing of resources, and our future. 

 

I love everyone whether they get on board or not, but you'll have to try to keep loving me as I fight on behalf of all of these voiceless and disposable animals and the well-being of our future together on Earth. I want to reunite with all of you in a beautiful world, not one devastated by the choices of a few generations. 

  • LIKE/LOVE 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stickyflames
1 hour ago, Troy said:

 

In my devouring of information there has been no generally implicit recognition of carbs as meaning some are good and some are bad. The carnivorous information really pushes the whole "every carb is bad" idea. Much of the carnivorous diet information was clearly about all carbs, and they encourage people to increase meat and dairy intake. They don't differentiate at all. Regardless, I would have a hard time trusting any information that doesn't differentiate or presumes that people know the difference. 

 

The only sources that differentiate and clarify and explain how carbs really work were those of vegetarian and vegan sources. I guess because the vegan diet has been so misunderstood and scoffed at for so long, and because so many of the younger generation are recognizing the necessity for changing our cruel and destructive habits, the good sources really have to have their information clear, concise, and referenced. 

 

There is bad and sloppy information all around on this subject, but I consistently saw meat eaters lumping all carbs together, which is deliberate misinformation at worst or irresponsible at best.

 

I'm just glad the world is changing. Too slowly, but it's changing. We always end up on the right side of history. The vegan diet is now mainstream and acceptable and the benefits are indisputable for our health, our environment, our climate, our fellow Earthlings, our sharing of resources, and our future. 

 

I love everyone whether they get on board or not, but you'll have to try to keep loving me as I fight on behalf of all of these voiceless and disposable animals and the well-being of our future together on Earth. I want to reunite with all of you in a beautiful world, not one devastated by the choices of a few generations. 

Loving you for it! I feel like a hurdle I have to consistently learn to deal with is how to voice what matters and let others reject or not reject me for it. This is not reflected in this chat, but sometimes I will speak up on veganism and get a response like " ok, but respect that others just do not want to make that choice! I wish you were just more inviting about it...it turns people off" . Because i am someone who values invitation and inclusiveness, comments like that make me question my delivery. Most of the time though I never see what is not inclusive about what I said. Most of the time when i feel like I am being asked to be inclusive or inviting, what  is really being said is " I do not like when you talk about this" . How do you speak passionately about an area you know deserves attention, consciousness , new creative paths, compassion ...knowing full well this area is not a priority for most...and NOT sound oppressive to others? Is it possible? What is the INVITING way to speak up about animal rights? Is there one? For the most part I have great friends who listen to me when I rant. They know I care, even if they are not vegan themselves, they know I care. It is sometimes profoundly healing just to know they will listen and can see that I am not speaking up to condemn them, but because I care.

  • LIKE/LOVE 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troy
26 minutes ago, Stickyflames said:

Because i am someone who values invitation and inclusiveness, comments like that make me question my delivery. Most of the time though I never see what is not inclusive about what I said. 

1

 

I say this with all due respect and total love, but it's not you, it's them. When the deflection comes in the forms you describe, it's purely a defense mechanism. It's the same defenses when talking to homophobic people about gay rights. And we hear it a LOT from people who are unconsciously prejudice or racist when talking about protections and equality for Black people and other "minorities." And we've heard the same responses when talking about the equality and protection for women. When we hear it there, we know exactly what that dismissive or irritated or evasive maneuvering means. ANd we know that a person fighting for equality for anyone is not doing anything to harm the people offended by that fight.

 

When we talk about animal rights and the devastating consequences of our unquestioned and ingrained choices regarding diet, the chiding and evasiveness and irritation coming in response are coming from the exact same places as when we talk about bettering the world for any other group. Again, I say this with all due respect and love, but it comes from a place of species privilege and disconnection from our fellow Earthlings, and because the consequences are so removed from us, the subject is assumed not to matter enough or not to matter at all because there is no evidence in the personal life that an issue should be discussed at all.

 

So this is why we keep bringing it up. Because the people who won't listen will never listen, and the people who might listen, eventually do. And if you irritate, annoy, and offend anyone along the way, that's a small price to pay when you compare that to the consequences of silence and courtesy.

  • LIKE/LOVE 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DianeHB
On 4/15/2017 at 9:56 AM, Maureen said:

Diet is a personal thing -- very personal. If people want to shorten their lives by eating too many (refined) "carbs"  that's their choice. Or perhaps it is more of a "belief thing" (as Seth talks about) and depending on how one thinks about the food they eat they may end up living the longest. Who knows ...and who am I to say any different. The bottom line is people can eat anything they want, no matter what we think about what they may want to eat, and it will always be their choice. Choice is what we are here to learn about -- isn't it? It's OK to know what's best for you but lets' stop being so arrogant about the food choices of others. Frankly, it's none of our business what other people eat and just because some people choose to remain quiet on the subject doesn't mean they don't have an informed, enlightened opinion of their own -- even though it may be different from what we, or others, think or believe.

 

It's true that if people want to shorten their own lives with diet, that's their business. But what I don't assume is that people have done their research and know about the consequences of their diets (especially when the research is newer), and I don't think talking about the consequences of certain foods on the body with references to research material is the same as telling people what to eat. People will still decide what they want to eat, and if they want to make changes it's up to them how best to approach that change. I still eat food that's not optimal for the body from time to time, but I don't have any illusions that I'm eating it for reasons other than habit, imprinting, social-smoothing, entertainment, or stress relief. 

 

In addition, learning about choice includes learning about consequences. It's easy to think that food choices are just about us when we get our food from the supermarket and have no visibility to where it came from. But someone had to grow the food, catch the food, kill the food, and when there are 7 billion of us on the planet, our collective food choices have a lot of consequences. It kills me whenever Michael talks about the biggest threat to the planet being climate change, and somebody brings up animal agriculture, whose effect on climate change is equal or greater than transportation, most people turn a blind eye because they don't want to stop eating animals. So I keep harping on health because most people care somewhat about their health even if they don't care about animals or the planet.

Edited by DianeHB
  • LIKE/LOVE 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DianeHB
On 4/14/2017 at 4:34 PM, Troy said:

@Sarah you nailed it! This video goes over that very thing in a succinct and friendly way!

 

 

 

OMG, I've heard about the Kempner Rice Diet quite a few times, but I didn't realize that it was made up of white rice, fruit, fruit juices, and sugar! White rice and fruit juice are basically sugar equivalents, and people still got better on them. That actually blows my mind.

  • LIKE/LOVE 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DianeHB
On 4/14/2017 at 3:18 PM, Bobby said:

@Troy I wouldn't say potatoes are "bad" per se but they do spike blood sugar because of the high carbohydate count that they contain.  Some people can handle that better than others.  Regardless, when you ingest something with that many carbohydrates or any for that matter, they get converted to glucose through the process of being metabolized.  Glucose can only be within a certain range to be considered healthy.  Too high or too low and you can actually die but you'd have to have a pretty major disorder for that to happen.  I think I've read that normally we have about a table spoon of sugar equivalent in glucose flowing through our bloodstream at any given time.  Any more than that and the pancreas goes to work pumping out insulin which promotes the cells of the body to uptake the glucose.  When they've had their fill and can't take anymore because they don't need it and can't store it, the remaining glucose gets shunted to the fat cells.  One way or another, it will come out of the blood stream.  Otherwise, you'd go into a diabetic coma.  Over time from consuming very high concentrations of carbohydrates, your pancrease is so over worked trying to do it's job of removing the glucose that it just wears out.  This would be type1 diabetes.  Or, your cells become insulin resistant and no matter what amount of insulin has been produce to help in the uptake of glucose, they refuse it.  And if that happens, the only recourse as mentioned before is fat storage and weight gain.  The body is an amazing machine I think and there is a method to the madness.  You're always better off not going on the rollercoaster high and then low glucose cycles.  Once you'r body has done it's job after a high glucose rush and then followed by its removal, you will experience "the crash" and hunger again soon after that.  Consuming food that keeps that cycle mostly stable will help prevent this.  As you've said, this can be done on a vegetarian/vegan way of eating.  You simply opt for the lower carbohydrate vegetables.  Ironically, or not, they just happen to be the green ones or the ones I doubt anyone could argue that are the most healthy and nutritious.

 

The problem with the insulin argument for low-carb diets is that meat also increase insulin production -- in fact, more so than even white pasta does. Meat causes as large an insulin spike as pure sugar. Saturated fat also increases insulin production because fat causes insulin resistance in muscle cells, whether the fat is eaten or stored in the body. So if you have someone eating a Standard Western Diet high in fat, meat, and refined carbs, it's a perfect combo for diabetes.

 

The precarious glucose problem you're describing is really only an issue when someone eats too much refined sugar. Whole grains, legumes, and fruits are digested more slowly and have slow glucose release because of the additional fiber, which have other benefits such as feeding healthy gut bacteria and assisting in digestion. There is no need to manage carb intake when one eats whole plant foods, and there is no insulin spike or crash. Also, when one is eating whole plant foods, it's really difficult to overeat because the fiber and water content makes you feel full before you can eat too much.

 

Your information is not wrong, it's just not the whole story. When you make all carbs the problem, then you have to either eat more meat or more fat to make up for the calories, and both of those things create other problems when eaten in high quantities. 

 

Here's a video on the comparison of insulin production from various foods (it only discusses exercise near the end), and the references in that video can be found here: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/paleo-diets-may-negate-benefits-of-exercise/.

 

 

Here's another one on fat and insulin resistance:

 

 

Edited by DianeHB
  • LIKE/LOVE 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maxim [memorial profile]

@DianeHB  I haven't been following this thread but saw your post. Interesting info.  A year ago I was advised by a doc to go paleo/mediterranian.  I was also referred to dietdoctor.com which pushes a low carb, high fat, lots of protein diet.  And of course they site study after study that makes them right.  Ye Gods!!!  Lately my blood tests showed I was not getting rid of the protein wastes out of my system within the norms of the test.  I've been convinced that carbs are the baddies.  At the same time I have sensed that there is no one way to diet.  I did another test over a year ago that tested my blood serum against 200 different foods.  That showed negative reaction of a number of veggies however not dairy, beef, fish or most beans.  Additionally I use muscle testing to determine what I can eat at any time. 

 

A story from a friend.  Her grandfather had some health issues.  He came to California to stay with his daughter and her husband and using alternative methods he greatly improved his health using diet and herbs at least.  He was in his 80s and after all the work they did he concluded that all he wanted to do was be with them and eat ice cream.  So it was and he died a short time later.  I sense he completed all his IMs for that level.

 

I have been drawn to vegan/veggie ideas for a long time since that seems to be part of our evolution and it seems healthier for the planet. 

 

 

 

 

  • LIKE/LOVE 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maxim [memorial profile]

Surprisingly, Chris Kresser, author of a couple of paleo books--which cover a lot of ground including veggies--thinks white rice is better than brown.  HE is a believer in carbs.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DianeHB
1 hour ago, Maxim said:

@DianeHB  I haven't been following this thread but saw your post. Interesting info.  A year ago I was advised by a doc to go paleo/mediterranian.  I was also referred to dietdoctor.com which pushes a low carb, high fat, lots of protein diet.  And of course they site study after study that makes them right.  Ye Gods!!!  Lately my blood tests showed I was not getting rid of the protein wastes out of my system within the norms of the test.  I've been convinced that carbs are the baddies.  At the same time I have sensed that there is no one way to diet.  I did another test over a year ago that tested my blood serum against 200 different foods.  That showed negative reaction of a number of veggies however not dairy, beef, fish or most beans.  Additionally I use muscle testing to determine what I can eat at any time. 

 

A story from a friend.  Her grandfather had some health issues.  He came to California to stay with his daughter and her husband and using alternative methods he greatly improved his health using diet and herbs at least.  He was in his 80s and after all the work they did he concluded that all he wanted to do was be with them and eat ice cream.  So it was and he died a short time later.  I sense he completed all his IMs for that level.

 

I have been drawn to vegan/veggie ideas for a long time since that seems to be part of our evolution and it seems healthier for the planet. 

Read more  

 

Maxim, I don't think talking about a general optimal diet for humans based on research precludes any individual food issues that people may have for whatever reason. There are studies that appear to support a low-carb perspective, but one of the really valuable things I learned from Dr. Greger is that when one comes across contradicting research, the next thing to do is to dig deeper into the methodologies and figuring out why they might get contradicting information. That's difficult for a layperson to do, which is why I love Dr. Greger so much. He is all about making nutritional research available for public consumption. 

 

Scientists have biases, too, some unintentional, some on purpose. Big industries fund manipulated research to throw confusion onto a subject with scientific consensus (like the harm from consuming saturated fat and cholesterol), and people will eat it up because they want permission to eat what they want to eat. Or they'll throw their hands up and say it's all too confusing, so I'll just keep eating what I'm eating. This is what the tobacco industry did for decades. For instance, it can be shown that eating cholesterol has no effect on blood cholesterol levels if you measure fasting cholesterol levels. However, if you measure cholesterol levels at hourly intervals after a meal, you'll find that it spikes after a meal and slowly comes down. In another example, it can be shown that eating a "high-fat" meal has little difference on cholesterol from eating a "low-fat" meal, but they compared a meal with 40% fat to one with 30% fat (I don't remember the exact percentages, so those may be off). Problem is, 30% fat is still high fat, so there was little difference from the higher-fat meal. This is another way that data can be manipulated. This is why consensus is important in nutrition science. If hundreds of research studies on a certain subject shows one result, and a handful shows opposite, the consensus conclusion has much more weight than the opposite. But the studies with minority conclusions can still be cited as reference to support whatever someone wants to support.

 

There is also the matter of interpretation of research. True scientists are often very careful and nuanced about drawing conclusions, whereas journalistic articles about the research are often sensationalized to draw readers. Then the same research gets repeated over and over in different publications so that it seems like it's a consensus coming from multiple sources when it's not. 

 

By the way, doctors are generally not authorities on nutrition, unless that's something they specialize in. They get little to no nutrition education in medical school. 

Edited by DianeHB
  • LIKE/LOVE 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troy
9 hours ago, Nadine said:

@Troy May I ask what's your daily dose of vitamin D now?

 

I've been taking 5,000 to 10,000. 

  • LIKE/LOVE 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ashley Hill

HI Troy, any updates regarding the 5PLs? I haven't received mine yet. Thanks!

  • LIKE/LOVE 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tkmppi

Hi,

 

I've been waiting for my 5 past lives for almost a year now. I hope they will arrive sometime in the not too distant future :)

 

Tuija

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...