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Has anyone else noticed the similarities between Hinduism and Michael Teachings?


Anirudh Ramachandran

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Anirudh Ramachandran

Perhaps all religions connect to the infinite in some way, but I was raised Hindu, and I'm able to see the connections between MT and Hinduism more easily.

 

  1. Caste/Varna: Ok, hear me out first. I believe all humans are equal, the caste system is discriminatory, and it has been for most or all of recorded history. But is it possible that caste is (or was originally intended to be) soul age? The Indus Valley script hasn't been deciphered yet, but the caste system didn't exist in the Indus Valley Civilization, or at least it worked very differently from historic India. Is it possible that they created the caste system to ensure that old and mature souls wield power, because they didn't trust younger souls to use it responsibly? Hypothesis below.
    • Dalits/untouchables: Infant souls. Their professions (jatis) included cleaning, domestic help, manual scavenging, leather making, and handling cremations.
    • Shudras: Child souls. Their professions included performing arts, carpentry, pottery etc.
    • Vaishyas: Young souls. Usually landlords, traders, and merchants.
    • Kshatriyas: Mature souls. Soldiers, security guards, and kings (the ruler, not the role).
    • Brahmans (original meaning of this word is "one who knows Brahma". Brahma is the name of the Vedic god, and has very similar characteristics to the "Tao" described in MT) Old souls. Served as advisors to the rulers, temple priests, administrators, and teachers.
  2. Gotra: The Saptarishis (seven saints) are said to be the founders of the Vedic religion. I understand this to be a metaphorical reference to the 7 roles. All Hindus are said to be descendants of the 7 saints, and this lineage is called "gotra". If your family (on the paternal side) belongs to Kaushika gotra for instance, Hindus believe you are a direct descendent of Kaushika (also known as Vishwamitra) himself. I was channeled as C1E3 (the Warrior entity in C1), and my family is Kaushika gotra. Until Troy channeled me, I believed I was a Warrior. Kaushika himself was a Kshatriya (the warrior caste) who did severe penance over multiple lifetimes and became a Brahmarishi (a saint who fully understands the nature of Brahma). Perhaps your Gotra refers to your cadre/entity, or your role. This one confuses me simply because I was channeled as a Scholar. If I had been channeled as a Warrior, I would have ordered charts for the rest of my family, and likely concluded that your Gotra is your role.
  3. Truth Love Energy: The casting model says that an entity has 3 sides and looks like a triangular cylinder. The 3 sides represent truth, love, and energy. Hindu scriptures say that when you open your Sahasraara (Crown) chakra, you get consumed in an ocean of "Satchitananda". Sat = Truth, Chit = Consciousness, Ananda = Bliss. Most people translate Sahasraara as "thousand petaled flower". However, the word "Sahasraara" in Sanskrit can be broken up as Sahasra+Ara. Sahasra = 1000, Ara = Saw/Awl/pointed tool. If you make the connection between MT and the Crown chakra, it tells me that enlightened beings are able to connect with their entity (1000 fragments arranged in the shape of a saw/pointed tool) while they're still alive. Your crown chakra is your connection with your entity.
  4. The 33 types of Devas/Gods: The Vedas say that the 7 chakras each have 33 traits that are associated with a Deva. I think the 33 Gods are references to traits like overleaves and features. The last 2 Devas are the Ashwin twins (also known as "Naasatyas" or non-truths). The word "Ashwa" means "horse" and "Ashwin" is "horse tamer". I think they're metaphorical references to the 2 features that we all spend our lives trying to tame.

 

Please do let me know your thoughts.

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Thanks very much for this knowledgeable information and informed perspective.  I think the theosophical roots of the "system" also may also explain something significant, historically speaking.  Notably with respect to Hinduism, however, I wonder what to make of the observation that MT seemingly has no place for either bhakti or puja.

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Anirudh Ramachandran
2 hours ago, Meg said:

Thanks very much for this information and perspective.  I think the theosophical roots of the "system" also may also explain something significant, historically speaking.  Notably with respect to Hinduism, however, I wonder what to make of the observation that MT seemingly has no place for either bhakti or puja.

I'm not sure what you mean by the theosophical roots of the system.

 

Bhakti is only one of the many paths in Hinduism, and the goal of all paths of Hinduism is to realize the deeper truth, which is that your nature is inseparable from Brahma. No Hindu sampradaya says that a lack of bhakti will lead to negative consequences, and that's consistent with MT. Bhakti towards an ishta devata will only help elevate your soul to higher ground (probably by erasing your features). It doesn't necessarily make Brahma happy.

 

The Wikipedia page of MT says that the MT philosophy is similar to Advaita Vedanta, and I agree with that. Advaita Vedanta followers accept the validity of Vishishtaadvaita as well as Dvaita paths. I'm guessing MT looks at bhakti the same way.

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Ah, thank you for this.  I will certainly need to study Wikipedia more carefully in the future.  Indeed, in the past century Gandhi and others did widely popularize identifying branches of Vedanta philosophy, and Advaita Vedanta in particular, as the religion of "Hinduism."  Welcome to the community!

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Anirudh Ramachandran
14 minutes ago, Meg said:

Ah, thank you for this.  I will certainly need to study Wikipedia more carefully in the future.  Indeed, in the past century Gandhi and others did widely popularize identifying branches of Vedanta philosophy, and Advaita Vedanta in particular, as the religion of "Hinduism."  Welcome to the community!

Thank you for the warm welcome 🙂

 

I wasn't aware of Gandhi stating that Hinduism is Advaita Vedanta (or particularly Advaita Vedanta). If he did, I disagree with him. Hinduism is about "Sampradaayaas"

 

Sampradaayaa = Sama+Pradaayaa = Equal+Pathway

 

Over millennia, various saints in India tried and tested multiple methods to reach the same destination, and they're all equally valid.

 

There are infinite pathways to the infinite. Advaita Vedanta is only one of them.

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Al Garcia

Things that the Michael teaching and Hinduism have in common:

 

Role and caste - Role is what your essence is playing these lifetimes, your most inner characteristics,  and not a role you are born to or what society says you are born to as the caste system says.

 

Avatars and infinite souls:

In Hinduism Vishnu has many avatars - krishna and Rama among them but in the Michael teachings Krishna was a 7th level old soul (not sure of the role) who hosted the infinite soul 5000 years or so give or take. From Krishna's teaching sprang a religion, which elaborated on the teachings so that it was no longer pure. It happens with all infinite souls teachings (Buddha and Jesus among them).

 

Other similarities include immortality of the soul, reincarnation, and Maya. There are Michael sessions in TLE regarding gurus and what enlightenment really is. Gurus are people just like us, who may or may not be more awake then others.

 

That being said, I have great affinity for Hinduism, though I don't want a guru I enjoy the teachings of several of them: Swami Satchinanda, Swami Muktananda, Swami Rudha, Swami Om, and even the Hare Krishnas. 

There teachings have helped me.

 

Om Shanti

 

 

 

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Anirudh Ramachandran
20 hours ago, Al Garcia said:

Role and caste - Role is what your essence is playing these lifetimes, your most inner characteristics,  and not a role you are born to or what society says you are born to as the caste system says.

I don't think you understood what I wrote. I'll clarify. Hindus have a Varna, Gotra, and Jati. Each one represents something different.

  1. Varna: This represents one of the five main castes. Dalit, Shudra, Vaishya, Kshatriya, Brahman. My hypothesis stated that the 5 Varnas represent the 5 soul ages.
  2. Gotra: This represents your lineage from one of the 7 founders of the Vedic religion. My initial hypothesis was that this represented your role, but my Gotra is the Warrior Gotra, and I was channeled as a Scholar from a Warrior entity. So your Gotra is either your role, or it's your entity.
  3. Jati: This is your profession. Depending on your Varna, certain professions were open to you, and your family most likely already had a profession that you were expected to follow into. There is no equivalent for Jati in MT. When people say the caste system is discriminatory, it's because of the Jati system that's ingrained in Varna.

In addition to these, there's your kula, which translates to "ancestry", but practically it refers to your sect and traditions.

20 hours ago, Al Garcia said:

Avatars and infinite souls:

In Hinduism Vishnu has many avatars - krishna and Rama among them but in the Michael teachings Krishna was a 7th level old soul (not sure of the role) who hosted the infinite soul 5000 years or so give or take. From Krishna's teaching sprang a religion, which elaborated on the teachings so that it was no longer pure. It happens with all infinite souls teachings (Buddha and Jesus among them).

We need to get into some of the nuances of Hinduism. According to Hindus, only the Vedas are Shrutis. The Shrutis were "heard" by saints when they were in deep meditative states, and the Vedas are the paramount book of Hindus as they are considered divine and supernatural. The equivalent in MT is channeled wisdom. All other scriptures are below the Vedas as they are "Smriti". The Smritis were "seen", meaning they are what saints observed in the world.

 

The Shrutis are eternal, and the Smritis need to be understood in the context of their times.

 

The Bhagavad Gita (and by extension the Mahabharata), Ramayana, Puranas (the Avatars of Vishnu are described in the Vishnu Purana), Upanishads, and other minor texts all fall under the category of Smriti.

 

There was no separate religion that sprang from Krishna's teachings. It was just a continuing observance of the Vedic religion according to the times.

20 hours ago, Al Garcia said:

Other similarities include immortality of the soul, reincarnation, and Maya. There are Michael sessions in TLE regarding gurus and what enlightenment really is. Gurus are people just like us, who may or may not be more awake then others.

I agree.

 

Om Shanti.

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petra

@Anirudh Ramachandran I so enjoy this thread of yours, very scholarly indeed! You know quite "a lot" about the dusty religion your Essence/Persona choose to be born into.

This is a great exercise in sorting "a story out" to arrive at the core.

 

You exude C1E3 material, as our Entity Mate @Oscar termed it.

 

I would like at this moment in time to invite @Moonfeather  from C1E7, as a knowledgeable observer of C1E3'ers, she has developed a keen sense of C1E3 fragments, and I wonder about what she would have to say about You Anirudh?

 

I remember reading that Michael said, that quite a part of their teaching, was a foundation, or weaved into what became Hinduism, if anyone knows to link us to that one, I appreciate, I didn't find it yet.

Keep it coming, this is all quite interesting, thank You!

 

 

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Anirudh Ramachandran
2 minutes ago, petra said:

I so enjoy this thread of yours, very scholarly indeed! You know quite "a lot" about the dusty religion your Essence/Persona choose to be born into.

Thank you, but I'm not sure if your choice of words to describe Hinduism (or any other religion) is appropriate for this public forum.

 

If I've misconstrued what you said, please do clarify.

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Patty

It’s really fun and interesting to tease out patterns that connect the Michael teachings to religions, philosophies, and even pop culture. I’ve really enjoyed your comparison of Hinduism and Michael Teachings. They may not be perfect parallels of each other, but I think the similarities to so many religions are one of the reasons the Michael Teachings seem familiar to us when we find them (in addition to that deep “knowing” that so many of us recognize). 

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13 hours ago, Anirudh Ramachandran said:

 

I wasn't aware of Gandhi stating that Hinduism is Advaita Vedanta (or particularly Advaita Vedanta).

Ah, thank you.  Allow me to clarify this then please.  My intent is certainly not to "explain" anything to anyone  about their own faith or heritage, just to clarify respectfully the statement above.  The scholarly literature interpreting Gandhi's rich teachings on Vendanta is lively, whether with respect to religion, ethics or politics (arguably, these represented much the same thing to him; e.g.,with interpretations of sat/Truth).  Certainly his legacy influenced what was considered "Hindu" inside and outside India in many foundational respects from the 20th Century to today.  We all know that his great love was the Gita.  This was also the case with the European theosophists, certainly Besant (e.g., on the Gita), and appropriations that followed on that (e.g., "Akashic plane," etc.).  Interestingly, Gurdjieff, who developed MT in Europe at about the same time, claimed his "orientalist" inspiration at least partially in Central Asian Sufism. All these esoteric European/colonial romantics shared a fascination with cosmology.  You will soon find that this tradition continues within TLE, I expect.

 

For essentialists and "true believers" here, a related question I would ask might be how much is M or their channels are merely adopting for expression a framework from neo-Platonism, orientalist theosophy, European occultism [and post-Christian teleological notions of the "evolution" of consciousness [call it a yuga if you like, sure], as per New Age and general millenarianism about a future "manifestation" of Christ/Vishnu/the Infinite/what-have-you], etc. as a  cultural "language" to work with? How will this change, now, under what are (we hope) post-colonial conditions? I find this issue, and critique, quite interesting indeed.  Personally, I find it more interesting, even, than considering a perennialist question of whether or not "all philosophies teach the same truth [always on somebody's particular, privileged terms lol]."  But that's just me.

 

The matter of how MT relates to "religion," Hinduism or any other (including Indigenous worldviews), is a welcome discussion here as well, and rather overdue in my personal opinion.  Hence my initial observation about puja (and possibly bhakti, including complexities as above on modern interpretation of the Bhagavad Gita, etc.).  I suspect that's another discourse that's stuck 100 years behind schedule, just saying, personally. I also think this discussion of Hinduism begins to reveal some of these critical concerns decisively.

 

However, just getting back to Gandhi, none of this speaks to the heart of what the Mahatma really taught, does it?  How is M silent (or not) on problems of personal and social ethics and human and interspecies justice (hello, where are you my dear @Birdy Bear, to continue this discussion?) I think the latter is what Troy and TLE are really making important contributions with in the TLE community, and I admire that a great deal.  I also know that TLE is also really looking critically at the impact of its inherited terms (in regard to race & gender, for example), and I think that's just fabulous.

 

Thank you!  Have a great day!  🙂

 

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Maureen
1 hour ago, Anirudh Ramachandran said:

Thank you, but I'm not sure if your choice of words to describe Hinduism (or any other religion) is appropriate for this public forum.

 

If I've misconstrued what you said, please do clarify.

 

I concur with @petra and would up the ante by calling all religions "dusty". They are great for historical references, perhaps even some wisdom and inspiration can be found sprinkled here and there amongst the dust, and even some nostalgia, but they are on the way out.

 

Here's a Q&A from MICHAEL SPEAKS on The State of The Planet from January 27, 2019. ✨ I will add that we are in a time of great and unprecedented change where it's hard to see what's around the bend, it's hard to see what the future will bring. Here's a glimpse of what's ahead for us, as human beings.

 

Question: Michael, are there any specific arcs of experience from the planet perspective that will likely come to a close during this year? And are there specific new arcs being initiated? How long are those arcs?

 

MEntity: Organized religion has come to a close. It will not disappear, but that arc of influence and status that shaped the world is over. There will be transition, but it is over. Oppression as a form of power is over. This may not seem possible, but it is over. Oppression will always exist in some form in some relationships, but not as a global form of power. Again, this will require transition and it will not disappear, but it is over.

 

Prosperity inequality is over. Again, this may seem absurd, but we are speaking in terms of massive arcs coming to a close because they will not work.

 

The practical implementation and stable reality around this shift away from these arcs would likely not be seen as fully anchored until around 2050.

 

But you are alive in a time that is a part of the ending of those arcs.

 

As for new arcs, we would say that SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY is locked in as an arc that would shape the world for centuries to come. This started with "political correctness" and grand experiments in "social media" and exploded in social justice and moves rapidly toward such things as resource-based economy.

 

We can explore the ending and beginning of arcs in further detail in more exchanges over 2019.

 

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Anirudh Ramachandran
21 hours ago, Maureen said:

I concur with @petra and would up the ante by calling all religions "dusty".

Call it anything you want. That's your right.

 

I'm just saying online forums bring certain expectations and responsibilities when you're talking to someone you don't know. I'm not religious in the dogmatic sense, but I consider myself Hindu culturally and socially. Right after calling my culture and heritage "dusty", he/she asked me to engage in further discussion. Pretty surprising.

 

I was willing to give them the benefit of doubt. That's why I asked if I misunderstood what they meant. 

 

21 hours ago, Maureen said:

Organized religion has come to a close. It will not disappear, but that arc of influence and status that shaped the world is over.

I agree. But I'll also say that what we know as Hinduism today, was known as "Sanatana Dharma" or "eternal virtues" earlier. Akin to MT, Hinduism tells you to complete monads in your life, and different varnas (soul ages) are prescribed different virtues. After learning about MT, the metaphorical in Hinduism has suddenly become a lot more clear to me.

 

I'd welcome a world where there is no organization/social expectation/compulsion in religion. Certainly the shrauta areas of Hinduism with elaborate rituals have turned into something akin to organized religion. But there are very rich texts (Patanjali Yoga Sutras, Hatha Yoga Pradipika, Upanishads) and areas (Advaita, Vishishtaadvaita) of Hinduism which help you understand yourself and the world more deeply. I wouldn't classify these scriptures as religious anymore than I would call MT a religion.

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Sam K
30 minutes ago, Maureen said:

 

I concur with @petra and would up the ante by calling all religions "dusty". They are great for historical references, perhaps even some wisdom and inspiration can be found sprinkled here and there amongst the dust, and even some nostalgia, but they are on the way out.

 

Here's a Q&A from MICHAEL SPEAKS on The State of The Planet from January 27, 2019. <img src="> I will add that we are in a time of great and unprecedented change where it's hard to see what's around the bend, it's hard to see what the future will bring. Here's a glimpse of what's ahead for us, as human beings.

 

Question: Michael, are there any specific arcs of experience from the planet perspective that will likely come to a close during this year? And are there specific new arcs being initiated? How long are those arcs?

 

MEntity: Organized religion has come to a close. It will not disappear, but that arc of influence and status that shaped the world is over. There will be transition, but it is over.

 

What does that actually mean, though?    What is "organized religion," in this context?  Organizations promoting an official creed or doctrine may be fading from history in favor of people seeking and adopting their own spiritual paths, but the positions and beliefs individuals adopt could still be classified as being broadly "Christian" or "Hindu" or "New Age," not prescriptively but descriptively.

 

Moreover, I'm not sure it's really even accurate to call Hinduism an "organized religion" at all.  The views and philosophies espoused by nominally "Hindu" people and groups vary wildly, and there's not really such a thing as "standard" or "heretical" Hinduism either.  It's more like a shared cultural context and lexicon than something like the Catholic Church.

 

I don't know.  I think that there's a tendency sometimes in MT communities to take the idea that "organized religion is going away," and expand it into "any worldview or spiritual path which can be labeled or generalized as being part of an existing religious strain is primitive and obsolete by default."  I really don't think that's supposed to be the takeaway.

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Crystal

I think that spiritual seeking and teachings and other such journeys of discovery will always be with us. Spirituality will always be with us. What I think is going to be going away is the structure and dogma that is “organized” religion. A lot of the “you must do this, pray like this, believe this, act like this or you’re going to H E Double Hockey Sticks or other such bad place” is accretions left over from baby and young soul times when, I believe, people really did need that structure and found it comforting.

 

I’ll continue the baby/young soul metaphor by saying when you, a human, are a young child, your parents take you everywhere. They drive you or they accompany you on the train. Then when you get to be a certain age, YOU are now in charge of your transportation. “Nope, I’m not going to drive you anymore. You have to figure out how to get there on your own.” And so it will be with humans. Teachings, spirituality, will always be there and always be sought. But the “how” and “why” and “what” will be less structured and spoon-fed to us and left up to us to discover, to absorb, to learn from, and to figure out.

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petra

Pretty surprising, is to go outside of expectations!  Great exercise in sorting "a story" out and getting to the core, love it, all philosophies, religious text etc. are also just that, for our own growth.

 

@Sam K  " The views and philosophies espoused by nominally "Hindu" people and groups vary wildly, and there's not really such a thing as "standard" or "heretical" Hinduism either.  It's more like a shared cultural context and lexicon than something like the Catholic Church."

 

I just drive to the next little town of 1500 people and they have 13 different churches representing Christianity including the catholic church, some cults and other invitations for your spiritual health.

Since the conception of any religion, in the thousands of years of their existence, people and groups vary wildly, of any of the official 12 religions known, each one of them has hundreds of offspring's. 

Point being, they were all steppingstones in our Spiritual Evolution and served at the time of their conception where we were, expressing the majority of the Soul Age Level of that time, and splintered off in their long time being into more subgroups, the more people had a chance to play around with them in their time frame. We are in a Paradigm shift and we will let go slowly of the old Paradigms that are not serving and standing in the way of the new, including old/dusty religions and philosophies.

 

@Crystal   Very well explained!!!

 

Michael Teachings are a alive Teaching, the interaction between the Teacher and the Student evolves it with each questionnaire, in our right now and here time.

I sum it up with what Michael said about Religion:

Religion: We have yet to see a more powerfully marketed, unquestioningly-purchased, and ultimately pointless product on your planet. This is not to say that value is not ultimately extracted from the experience, but we have seen more detours in personal and global evolution due to the freely accepted oppression of religion than from any other context in your history. Religion is a Young Soul construct using the ingredients of Baby Soul myths.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Anirudh Ramachandran
18 hours ago, petra said:

Since the conception of any religion, in the thousands of years of their existence, people and groups vary wildly, of any of the official 12 religions known, each one of them has hundreds of offspring's. 

Hey Petra. This is where I feel the need to explain the difference in eastern philosophical approach. Catholicism and Protestantism can be defined as SECTS of Christianity. There is a large body of work that's common between the two, but they're mutually incompatible beliefs.

 

In Hinduism, Shaivism and Vaishnavism are wrongly classified as sects of Hinduism by western Indologists, but they're actually not that at all.

 

The Vedas themselves say "Ekam sat vipraha bahudha vadanti", which means that there are many paths to reach the one truth. The Shaivites worhip Shiva the destroyer, who destroys the evil (features for MT students) inside you and the obstacles in your life. The Vaishnavites worship Vishnu the protector/operator of the universe, thus building the true self. You can become your true self either by destroying your features, or by strengthening your soul. The end result is the same, but the paths are different. That's why they're known as Sampradaayas or equal pathways. There's no incompatibility between these beliefs. Both sampradayas say that Vishnu and Shiva are manifestations of Brahma.

 

Within the Abrahamic religious landscape, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam are considered different religions even though there's a lot of common ground.

 

But the Dharmic landscape is very different. Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism can be classified as differing Dharmas (virtues), but not as differing religions. To call them religions takes away from their true meaning, as Dharma cannot be translated easily. A Hindu Sanyasi will freely learn from a Jain or Buddhist Sramana, and vice versa. It's not like the exclusivity of organized religion. Until Hindu Nationalist parties (baby and young souls) took over the political landscape in the past decade, Hindus didn't proselytize or convert anyone for millennia.

 

 

18 hours ago, petra said:

Michael Teachings are a alive Teaching, the interaction between the Teacher and the Student evolves it with each questionnaire, in our right now and here time.

Various channels have already stated that India has historically been an old soul country, but in recent past it has become a baby soul country that's gearing up for young soul stage. Hinduism and Buddhism appeal to a lot of Michael Students because they're old soul philosophies with no dogma. I need to be careful when I say this, because there are aspects of Shrauta Hinduism which have ritualism and inflexibility, but that's one of many many faces of Hinduism. Hindu philosophies evolved as "Guru Shishya Parampara" meaning "Tradition of teachers and students". The student would start their own school after graduating, and take the good of what they learnt from the teacher, discard the rest, and add their own flavor to it. That's what MT is doing now. Most travelers seek spiritual awakening in India and Tibet because the Himalayas are a place to let go of all your preconceived notions, and know yourself intimately.

 

18 hours ago, petra said:

Religion is a Young Soul construct using the ingredients of Baby Soul myths.

I agree. But MT has also stated that Neem Karoli Baba, Ramana Maharshi, Swami Satchitananda, and many other Hindu Gurus were late old souls. They didn't preach anything radically different from what was already stated in Hindu scripture.

 

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Evelin

I can’t find the reference (yet), but I recall Michael stating that Hinduism was originally a teaching of the Roles and reincarnation, but over time it got ”dusty” and diluted, the part about reincarnation turned into Roles being social roles and hereditary, which created the caste system.

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Anirudh Ramachandran
7 minutes ago, Evelin said:

I can’t find the reference (yet), but I recall Michael stating that Hinduism was originally a teaching of the Roles and reincarnation, but over time it got ”dusty” and diluted, the part about reincarnation turned into Roles being social roles and hereditary, which created the caste system.

I'd love to see that. I've been doing some power searches on Google within the TLE site. So far, I've found nothing.

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Cong

Here is your best bet:

 

[Tibtyc] My understanding is that caste originally had to do with Age.

 

[Annsge] (Think “Caste” had more to do with Essence Role)

 

[M Entity] The caste system was originated and propagated only as a means of socio-political control, not as an extension of any mystical or spiritually-relevant systems; regardless of how that system can retrospectively be interpreted.

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Anirudh Ramachandran
1 hour ago, Cong said:

The caste system was originated and propagated only as a means of socio-political control, not as an extension of any mystical or spiritually-relevant systems; regardless of how that system can retrospectively be interpreted.

Thanks. I need more detail, as some things aren't adding up to me. I'll have to schedule a session and ask questions.

 

@Evelin This stands in contrast with what you said. Could you please clarify?

Edited by Anirudh Ramachandran
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Cong

Welcome to the community @Anirudh Ramachandran. Happy to see you already start to ask questions! that's what keeps this teaching alive. Can't wait to see you sharing what you get from the session.

 

I highly recommend reading this piece about Michael teaching and its similarity/differences from other teachings.

 

 

Quotes from this article:

 

"A Teaching is anything taught, and is often a collection of basic guidelines, insights, truths, laws, principles, or assumptions that can be used for application and action in a specific direction. Almost anything can be a Teaching, and almost any Teaching can be either Active/Static, or Passive/Alive.

 

Examples of active teaching:  The Bible, The Qur’an, The Bhagavad Gita, The Torah. They require constant infusion of new blood to keep them afloat, to keep them animated, like a propped up body from A Weekend At Bernie’s. Active, Static teachings are all about your being stimulated, being excited, usually filled with practitioners who are more preoccupied with pushing the teaching, recruiting, saving, gathering up chosen ones, convincing others of their specialness or lack of specialness, rescuing, condemning, dividing, escaping, and so on.

 

Examples of passive teaching:  The Michael Teachings, Astrology, Tarot, Shamanism, Dance, Music, Math, Science, Art, Philosophies, and many others, including Life. Yes, these are teachings. These teachings inherently make it difficult to establish any authority, and rely almost entirely on discovery and invitation for propagation, while naturally putting any student directly at the intimate core of determining the value and meaning of the teaching.

 

In an Active/Static Teaching, you become the blood that keeps the teaching from disappearing.

 

In a Passive/Alive teaching, it is your participation, your application, and your questions that keep the teaching alive and evolving, so that you can use your blood for yourself.

 

So keep on asking your questions, even if others make you feel uncomfortable for doing so. Ask. Ask. Ask."

 

 

 

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Anirudh Ramachandran
11 hours ago, Cong said:

In an Active/Static Teaching, you become the blood that keeps the teaching from disappearing.

 

In a Passive/Alive teaching, it is your participation, your application, and your questions that keep the teaching alive and evolving, so that you can use your blood for yourself.

I think the lines are blurred.

 

Are Yoga and Meditation active or passive teachings? By your definition they're passive/alive teachings.

 

But then the Bhagavad Gita tells you to practice key yogic concepts like pratyahara (control of the panchendriyas/5 senses), ishwara pranidhana (surrender), and dharma (virtuous behaviour based on the situation). You can't read the Bhagavad Gita like a novel. You have to apply it like you apply Yoga in your life.

 

To say that the Bhagavad Gita is an active/alive teaching is to say that ballet is an active/alive teaching, just because someone wrote a book on ballet that's now standard.

 

All Hindu scriptures have a goal of Yoga (union). That's it.

 

And thank you for the encouragement. I'll keep questioning, and writing. After all, Troy told me I'm a Scholar in Observation 🙂

 

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Connie Stansell-Foy
8 hours ago, Evelin said:

the part about reincarnation turned into Roles being social roles and hereditary, which created the caste system.

 

@Evelin, I had read that, too. I think it was in one of the original Yarbro books. If I find it, I'll let everyone know.

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