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ENERGY REPORT - NOVEMBER 2020


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Rosario

thank you wholeheartedly!!! @petra @Becca the Student @Connor❤️

it's a big relief and milestone...!! :') I feel I can finally breathe easily after a week of having a "knot" in all my chakras. 

 

and post-nexus feels!!

I spend the day doing very little, writing blog post ideas and tweaking my website as a way to keep myself entertained...and BAMM...since a few hours ago I've been flooded by waves of sadness, grief and loneliness....started reminiscing all the difficult things I've been through this year but don't talk much about, and allowed myself to feel super vulnerable and ask for love and reassurance

 

And of course crying rivers....!! lots of raw and healing tears 

now I feel a bit lighter and clearer, but I'm sure a second wave is coming haha

been watching some romance films to trigger it even more xD 

 

 

 

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ENERGY REPORT November 2020   2020 OVERLEAVES ROLE: Sage (emphasized all year) CENTER: Higher Emotional (emphasized all year) (and Emotional Center) GOAL: Submission (emp

Yes.   I asked Micheal about a full blown civil war a few years ago (I think Bush years).  At the time he said the likelihood was around 25%.     However, they added that like many

Biden won Pennsylvania. He actually won. If I had the energy I would cry right now. 

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Connie Stansell-Foy
11 hours ago, NickG said:

I got this huge rush of energy in me and I don't know what to do with it.

 

Jeez, I wish I did. So much I need to do, and no inclination to do it.

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Maureen

Aren't most of us suffering from brain exhaustion right now? This is an excellent TED Talk!! So many layers. It's human understanding at it's best and it brought to mind the The Nine Needs and The Nine Priorities from the Michael Teachings... and likely more. 😨✨🤩

 

How to fix the exhausted brain | Brady Wilson | TEDxMississauga
 

 

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Janet H
On 11/17/2020 at 4:44 PM, Leela Corman said:

I was apprehensive about running into my old boss, but when I got there he was gone and an older woman who was also Nelson Mandela (?!) was there, and was extremely happy to see me.

@Leela CormanYes to everything you wrote. So well-said. This part about Nelson Mandela delighted me. It struck me as so symbolically significant and celebratory for all of us.

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I seem to be responding to issues of truth more than I ever have, either with crying, or with laughing. 

For the past two weeks I have been agonising how to integrate my new young adult female cat into life with my older male cat. I have been encouraged by enlisting a cat behaviour expert and by watching Jackson Galaxy and by getting advice from @Juni. We start Kiri (my new cat) and Zion (my older cat) on a gradual introduction program to each other late next week. I am ensuring that I spend equal time with them. As I started off by initially introducing them to each other (without the animal behaviour experts advice), they both had a fear of each other, so at some low points I wanted to rehome Kiri, then, I don't know what happened, but I decided to persevere. 

 

Actually what happened is separating them is going really well. They have settled again and my lovely older cat is spending time with me and enjoying my company again. Poor fella. He probably thought that Kiri was going to usurp him (she has charged him twice right out of his catdoor to the outside and it understandably made him very fearful). So he is getting lots of cuddles and attention. He is my boy.

 

So I have either been tearful, or the other day, my partner showed me some funny photos google search pinterest cake expectations and reality. The hedgehog made me piss myself with laughter and I remember thinking this is no different to crying, it is the same release, only not sad. 

 

So I look forward to introducing my cats to each other, with an expert program, next week sometime. And then last night, there is a superb movie on Netflix by Sophia Loren's son Edoardo Ponti, called The Life Ahead which was wonderful and very moving. I hope that I don't sustain this level of feeling, I find it very difficult to re route to objectivity. It is like I *have* to feel these truths to comprehend them.  Maybe this is the grieving and re orientation that is referred to in this months energy report....

 

Edited by AnnaD
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WolfAmethyst
On 10/30/2020 at 7:23 PM, Troy said:

The election is quite relevant as a catalyst, regardless of where one is in the world, but the experiences on the other side of it speak to many layers of experiences accumulated over the year. For example, some may assume a “win” that brings great relief and renewal would also bring a shift into positive pole overleaves, but some may respond to the win as a chance to catch up with themselves and grieve all that has passed over the year. Some may assume a “loss” that brings profound despair and dismay would also bring a collapse into the negative poles of the overleaves for the year, but a loss may trigger a shift into a courage and strength and reignite the best in that person that had been in limbo, asleep, or obscured over the past year or so.

Putting Trump past us is like exiting an abusive relationship: it takes time 

Under Trump many had a ‘collective hypervigilance and anxiety of what he might do next’, experts say – so how do we unpack these past four years?

 

by Amil Niazi

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/nov/25/trump-trauma-experts-abusive-relationship 

 

For millions of Americans and nervous election viewers around the world, the month of November has been a seesaw of emotions. Tentatively able to envision a life outside the Trump shadow, many could finally name the mental, emotional and physical toll the past four years have had on them, reflecting on the feelings of depression, insomnia, restlessness and anxiety that, for them, have defined the president’s term in office for so many.

 

Emboldened by the promise that in a few short months they would no longer have to live in fear of a national security-threatening tweet or Fox News-induced meltdown, millions of people are beginning to process their feelings.

 

On Twitter, the actor Lauren Holly lamented: “I’m still gonna have to self soothe myself for months to get over my Trump trauma.” The writer and cybersecurity expert Rodney Caston was more blunt, tweeting: “Whether we like it or not, we’re all trapped in an abusive relationship with Trump at the moment.” The sentiment was so popular that the hashtag #trumptrauma trended for days.

 

There are certainly many parallels between the end of Donald Trump’s presidency and a psychologically violent relationship. Think about the temper tantrums, the refusal to accept reality, mood swings, fear of reprisal and a sense of looming danger: all are hallmarks of controlling and abusive behavior.

Farrah Khan is a gender-based violence expert and member of the government of Canada’s Advisory Council on the Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence – and she echoes how Trump’s time in office has often mirrored domestic violence.

 

“Throughout his time in office, Trump would belittle communities, enact state violence through policies, act out in vengeful ways when he felt slighted and cut off access to supports or protections, isolating communities from each other,” she tells me. “I feel that under Trump many of us had a collective hypervigilance and anxiety of what he might do next. This has shown up in things like night terrors or constantly scrolling on social media for real or perceived threats from him to your community.”

One of the most common ways an abuser exerts control is through isolation, cutting their partners off from the support of their communities and loved ones. Through his most despicable policies on issues like race, immigration and LGBTQ+ rights, it can be argued that Trump has pitted Americans against each other, sowing discord and creating rifts that push his supporters further from their family and friends.

For years, Trump has managed to isolate his most fervent followers from reality, creating a parallel Maga world where Covid-19 is little more than a hoax, mail-in ballots don’t count (unless they do) and behind every pizza place lurks a pedophile ring. And like many coercive partners, Trump refuses to let go.

Like many, Khan’s immediate reaction on election night was one of suspicion and worry. She wrote that the “most dangerous time in a violent relationship is when you leave”. She’s still concerned that Trump’s violent rhetoric is escalating rather than declining. “As someone that works daily with survivors of domestic violence and other forms of gender-based violence, I know that the risk of violence is often highest during the period of separation. People who cause harm will use anything available to them from coercive threats, lies or pleading to force the partner to stay,” she says.

 

Those are hardly words normally ascribed to the transition of power from one US president to the next, but prescient given the lengthy and increasingly futile legal battle Trump continues to wage in hopes of denying the reality of his loss and his increasingly tenuous grip on power. In a recent Guardian article on his increasingly unhinged behavior, Larry Jacobs, director of the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance at the University of Minnesota said: “This behavior is even more erratic than usual and he has retreated. He has put himself in a form of psychological isolation. His emotional state is clearly abysmal.”

Breaking up with an abusive person is unnerving – they leave little room to breathe or to imagine a life without them. The fear they instill is meant to undermine your sense of self, your sense of safety and your connection to the world around you. They erode your trust in your community and the institutions designed to keep you safe in an effort to tether themselves to you. They normalize violence.

But there is indeed life on the other side. So how do we unpack these past four years and reckon with the scars this presidency has left on our collective psyche?

 

Khan suggests facing the damage head on: “Go to therapy: understand that trauma can result from community violence, state violence and interpersonal violence. You are not alone and there is nothing you should be ashamed of.”

 

Trump can see his control on the American people waning and so continues to lash out but whether he chooses to accept it or not, this relationship is over.

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Maureen
39 minutes ago, WolfAmethyst said:

If a ghost possessed someone in 2020... 🤣

 

 

LOL!!! Yes, I don't say "aboot" for about (who does???), or "eh", but I do like maple syrup.  🙂 

 

 

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Jody Bower

Have any of you read Steven Pinker's "The Better Angels of Our Nature"? In it, he talks about how things have gotten better over the years for everyone - and he offers plenty of proof - despite the fact that we think it's gotten worse. It isn't just because we know more about the wrongs still being perpetrated in the world, although we definitely do thanks to the Internet. Pinker argues that over time humans have gotten far more empathetic, so we are more bothered by wrongs than we used to be . . . and more bothered over time even as the wrongs themselves become lesser. Contrast the response to the killing of George Floyd with the responses to the outrages of the KKK only 50 years ago, which most whites ignored totally. Two hundred years ago people went to see hangings and decapitations for fun; two thousand years ago we put unwanted babies out on the hillside to be eaten by animals. Women had no rights at all in most cultures, even the "enlightened" ones, a century ago, and were seen as things to be owned and used; ditto animals. My own ancestors gave the English so much trouble when they conquered our land that a law was passed that anyone with our clan name could be killed on sight, however innocent otherwise they might be, and so we were hunted and forced into hiding/emigrating.

It feels to me like there has been a huge uptick in empathy recently. Actions or ideas that used to be acceptable or ignored now horrify us. As our sensitivity to them grows, the more obvious they are to us and the worse they appear. But the shift isn't toward more evil; the shift is toward greater awareness of and refusal to go along with those evils. 

Those who haven't made the shift are dwindling in numbers. I don't doubt they feel the world turning against them, telling them "all the things you were taught were okay are not okay." I suspect a lot of the actions we abhor are reactive attempts to reassert the old ways, perhaps to test how many out there are still of the old mindset . . . and to reassure themselves that yes, we're not dying out, we're not being left behind . . . but the amount of lying to each other and to themselves is taking more and more effort. 1500 people turning out to protest the election becomes one million, etc. In my state a widely advertised Thanksgiving protest against the anti-COVID measures of our governor drew 20 people, but those interviewed insisted that this proved that most people were against those measures. 

The dinosaurs can't accept that the meteor of compassion has hit and is changing the climate permanently, but their acceptance isn't required.

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Jody Bower

re that TED talk: dopamine doesn't help some of us . . .  from Tips for Teaching: The Brain Game— Teaching Strategies for Introverted vs. Extroverted Students by Erica L. Martin, Lecturer, School of Theology and Ministry, Seattle University martine@seattleu.edu doi:10.558/bsor.v43i39
 

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To understand the physiological differences between introverted and extroverted brains, we need to talk about neurotransmitters, chemicals in the brain, specifically: dopamine, adrenaline, and acetylcholine. Dopamine is our friend; along with influencing hormonal processes, dopamine makes us feel good. The pleasurable effect of dopamine causes us to repeat the behaviors that stimulated its release. Neurological research demonstrates that introverts have fewer dopamine receptors in their brains than extroverts. Introverts, therefore, require less dopamine than extroverts to reap dopamine’s reward. An overabundance of dopamine causes introverts to feel over-stimulated and anxious. Extroverts have more dopiminergic receptor sites, and therefore require more dopamine than introverts. An important ingredient in the dopamine-reward system is adrenaline, whose presence causes more dopamine to be released. This is the physiological reason that extroverts prefer stimulating environments and so-called “risky” behaviors (who hasn’t felt the flush of an adrenaline rush as you raise your hand to publicly offer an opinion?) in order to arrive at the dopamine release we all crave. Being more sensitive to dopamine, introverts will try to block out a lot of the extraneous stimuli that could give them too much dopamine in their brain at a given time. Introverts tend to avoid superfluous bursts of adrenaline, adopting a more inward stance and appreciating a less-stimulating environment. The dominant neurotransmitter pathway utilized in introverted brains is acetylcholine. In blood flow studies of extroverted and introverted brain function, researchers found that the introvert pathway is significantly longer, and runs through a different area of the brain. The acetylcholine pathway of introverts travels to the frontal part of the brain through areas that deal with memory, reasoning, and feelings. The extrovert adrenaline pathway travels through areas involved in alertness, appetites, emotions, and importantly, movements and actions (Laney 2002). Understanding the different neurotransmitters and pathways utilized by extroverted and introverted brains is key to shaping an instructional environment that elicits the best results from both extroverted and introverted students. Whereas extroverts will go from stimulus to response in a very rapid manner, introverts will take longer, and introverted students will think and perform better when anxiety-producing adrenaline rushes are limited.

 

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“This nexus may also bring with it the first voice of an Infinite Soul host”


I’m curious where one would watch for this kind of voice speaking.  It won’t be on CNN or Fox news, so what sources do you keep your eye on for this kind of message?  

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@AndrewC In one of Troy's sessions from August this year, Michael said the following:

 

Quote

Infinite Souls may be romanticized and mythologized in history, but in their time they are fairly low-key and rarely recognized. They are almost always recognized as disruptors of patterns, but are rarely lifted to any special position.

 

Sounds like they may go entirely under the radar (as opposed to Transcendental Souls of which there are several who have sought the spotlight). From what I remember from other sessions, Infinite Souls ususally teach a few key people and then the teaching spreads from there. The whole thing appears to be a bit of an anticlimax.

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DianeHB
1 hour ago, Petter said:

@AndrewC In one of Troy's sessions from August this year, Michael said the following:

 

 

Sounds like they may go entirely under the radar (as opposed to Transcendental Souls of which there are several who have sought the spotlight). From what I remember from other sessions, Infinite Souls ususally teach a few key people and then the teaching spreads from there. The whole thing appears to be a bit of an anticlimax.


I don’t think they would be completely unknown, that would kind of defeat the purpose. Also previous Infinite Souls didn’t have access to worldwide media like we do now, so they had no choice but to spread the teachings through multiple others. I think Michael just meant that people in their time saw them as normal people and not as gods with special powers. 
 

To respond to Andrew, I don’t know what news sources they would show up in, but they may be still obscure at this point, and they may be outside the US. TLE is widespread enough around the world that I figured somebody would find one here and there. 

Edited by DianeHB
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Crystal
45 minutes ago, Juni said:

Anyone else getting absolutely walloped by grief this past week?

 

Yes. A lot of “where did the past four years go? It seems more like four decades in some sort of time limbo!” And “I miss my cats, especially my heart cat.” Little stuff like that.  Normally I love this time of year but it’s more muted this year to me. Maybe it’s like holding a breath for four years and then exhaling all of a sudden...

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Leela Corman

I've definitely had days where I have been, yeah. All along, but in a specific way since the election. Not so much this past few days, but definitely within the past week. One really intense day a week or so ago. I'm also still numb and muted.

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Jeroen

There was a recent public event over Zoom which included Dr. Carolyn Finney & Woman Stands Shining (Pat McCabe) I thought I would share here in case anyone would like to watch.

 

November 17th, 2020 at Middlebury College.

"In the spirit of embracing 2020 vision, Diné (Navajo) activist, artist and ceremonial leader Woman Stands Shining (Pat McCabe) & African American storyteller, activist, performer-in-the-making and Middlebury Scholar-in-Residence Dr. Carolyn Finney are coming together in an intentional conversation about race, the environment, intimacy and right relations."

 

 

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