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Juni
44 minutes ago, Ludmila Karameros said:

I was vaccinated in NYC in Jan and Feb with the Pfizer-BioNtech vaccine.  Had mild symptoms after the 1st shot along with being tired for several days and fever and chills after the 2nd shot, then tired again.  Glad for the reactions which showed my body was fighting the virus. 
The best was feeling relieved afterwards. I’m still careful and usually wear two masks when I leave my apartment to go out.  Masks are mandatory in my high-rise building which houses about 1K tenants sharing the elevators, lobby, mailroom etc. 

Once in my car I take the masks off and am amazed how many people leave them on, even when driving alone!

Hoping everyone gets vaccinated for the greater good. 

    I leave my mask on in the car because it's easier just not to touch it once it's on in order to stay hygienic.   

I work in a moderate risk building(unable to completely socially distance and we have to share a bathroom with both healthcare workers and their patients) and  we require extra PPP. 
I put a mask on as soon as I step outside my home and drive to work with it on. 
It's much simpler than trying to clean my hands and put it on  right before going into the building and then have to do it all again when I put on either another mask or one of the thicker single layer ones you aren't supposed to double mask. 

It's an ordeal  being at work: wash hands, touch things, wash hands, straighten mask, wash hands, wipe down workstation, wash, out to car for my break because the break room isn't feasible as far as I'm concerned, wash hands after entering car by scrubbing vigorously with a cleansing wipe, remove mask, eat/drink,  do all this in reverse in order to enter the building, repeat for lunch and afternoon break,  ad nauseam.

It's much easier to just have a mask on as soon as I leave the house(my neighbors also suck and refuse to wear masks, statewide mandate be damned) and not take it off until I'm home and out of my work clothes and I've washed my hands(again.)

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I got my first vaccination recently and made me wonder who else has received their vaccination, either in part of full.   Let us know:   if you have received yours where yo

I'm in Providence, Rhode Island, which is apparently doing a very good job of running its vaccination program. I'm not yet eligible, as I'm 48 and have no comorbidities. My doctor tells me she thinks

LOL, I do think this is particularly funny that you are laissez-faire about dying, but express fear of the very unlikelihood of metaphorically being burned at the stake but no concerns about the very

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Juni

 I just realized I left out the fun part of trying to time bathroom visits so I won't be in there with someone not from my work and even worse, potentially not wearing a mask at all.  I try to be alone, because even though my coworkers are already in the same place, we are supposed to avoid one another, so sometimes it's up to the other one bathroom upstairs  and hope for better luck.  There are no single occupancy bathrooms in the building, to my knowledge.
Add in all the washing and turning off the faucet and opening the doors with different paper towels. 
It's logistically exhausting. 
And the virus doesn't care. 
It just needs me or anyone else to slip up once. 

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John

I'm in Central Kentucky.  I got my first shot of the Pfizer vaccine on Saturday, March 6th.  I've got an appointment for my second shot on Saturday, April 3rd.  My mom (who's also here with me) got her second shot of the Moderna vaccine this past Thursday, March 4th -- so she'd fully vaccinated and in about two weeks should have her antibodies in full swing.  Two weeks after I get the second shot, we'll be able to start doing things like have a few friends over -- staying safe and careful of course!  My dad (who lives in north-central Texas) got his second Pfizer shot on March 4th too.

 

So far my family and I have managed to stay healthy, safe, and free of illness!  Knock on wood, it'll stay that way!

 

Hope y'all stay safe and healthy too -- and that you're able to get vaccinated easily, quickly, and well (with no or minimal side effects) when you want!

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Marigold

I see many people here getting the mRNA vaccines but since most TLE-ers are from the US, it makes sense. In my country, Bulgaria, the vaccine that is most widely used is the Oxford-AstraZeneca. A number of people here are unhappy with this as it was noted that top officials and public figures received the Pfizer-BioNtech and Moderna vaccines which have a higher efficacy rate,  leading many to perceive these vaccines as being reserved here mostly for the elite. So y'all are getting the fancy stuff.😄

 

I live in Sofia and cases are getting exponentially high here, we are not just in the red zone but in the purple zone (which is worse) and my country is really, really lagging behind with vaccinations, I think we are in one of the last places.  Pro-Russian (read: pro-Putin) parties here are lobbying for the Russian vaccine which still has not received approval from the EMA (European Medicines Agency) but despite that there are already other countries in Europe who have begun using it.

 

I'm still not vaccinated, neither are my mom and sister. I don't communicate with my father, we avoid him due to his pathological narcissism, so I don't know about him. My grandmother recently got vaccinated with the first dose of AstraZenca and she felt really bad for several days with a high fever, chills but now she's fine. My sister can't because people under 18 are not administered the vaccine and my mom was told by her doctors not to due to her hormonal therapy for Cancer which she will continue to take for years. This is really disappointing so we will have to continue for a long time with the traditional anti-COVID measures in the absence of a vaccination, at least until this whole thing has  really slowed down. As for me, I'm still wondering when to get vaccinated. I also have concerns regarding side effects that may show up much later, such as autoimmune disorders. I'm worried that with the new mutations the vaccines we have may become ineffective to a great degree, to the point of not even preventing death or severe complications if you get infected. People need to get the vaccines while there are strict measures to avoid the arising of deadlier mutations, we can't loose up things and expect magic fixes.

 

It's still not entirely clear whether getting the vaccine means you can't transmit the virus to others so responsibility regarding COVID still needs to be encouraged, especially to protect people who can't get the vaccine due to different factors.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/feb/27/the-great-unknown-do-covid-vaccines-stop-you-spreading-the-virus

 

A friend of mine who knows some people who are scientists and work in the immunology sphere told me that they express concerns regarding the new mRNA technology because of the ingredients used to get the mRNA into the cells and that long term conseqences such as autoimmune risks are not considered enough (as I mentioned earlier in my post) and that those may show up many years later. Of course, scientists vary in their opinions and others will say it's mostly safe, that those saying the opposite are spouting debunked stuff, so go figure. I can't know for sure.

 

I think I'll get a vector vaccine anyway, since that's what will be mostly available so likely AstraZeneca or the Johnson & Johnson one which also comes in one dose. But I'll have to wait. And until then, I hope the vaccines will have been modified to work better against the new mutations, although we may have even newer variants until then if humanity doesn't try enough to contain COVID.

 

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SharvariJ

I'm too young to get the vaccine in the first few waves, but my family should be getting it soon. My parents are both over 60, my grandpa is 93, and my grandma is 85. It took some convincing for my grandparents to agree to get the vaccine. It's not because they're anti-vaxxers; they just have a dim comprehension of how bad things are since they almost never leave home. Their whole argument was, "Nothing ever happens to us so why should we bother going all the way to a hospital and inconveniencing you young folks to take us there." Obviously, their grandkids (including moi) all got together and told them the vaccination was not optional for them lol.

 

Anyway, the process in Mumbai is still a bit haphazard. There are two available vaccines, CoVaxine and CoviShield (Oxford-AstraZeneca), both manufactured here in India. There is no choice offered, and you take the one that is available at the centre of your choosing. Other Indian cities have started issuing token numbers and giving out appointments based on registrations via a newly-released mobile application. The Mumbai municipality is a bit slow on the uptake and has to iron out many kinks in the process, thanks to our enormous migrant population. Things seem to be improving though, and I'm planning to take the grandparents to get vaccinated in the next week or so. 

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AnnaElisa
13 hours ago, Manshuk said:

I just don't want to be burned at the stake. 

I don't want to start or continue a discussion about vaccines here, and I think that was not the purpose of this thread - I just want to say that I value your way of seeing these things, @Manshuk, and that you - as everyone of us - have the right to make your own choices when it comes to your own body. 

Edited by AnnaElisa
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Anirudh Ramachandran

My parents got the vaccine in India last month as they're over 60.

 

My father-in-law got it earlier this week (also in India), and my mother-in-law should get it next month.

 

Me and my wife live in Canada. I'm estimating that we should get it by June or July, given our age group.

 

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Janet

I had my first dose of the Pfizer vaccine on February 23 and I go back next Tuesday for the second dose. My only reaction to the first dose was a sore arm, but even that only bothered me when I turned over on it in my sleep. 

 

It's supposed to snow like crazy here in Denver between now and my next dose, but I figure I can tromp my way through snow to the hospital since it's only a quarter mile away. 😉

 

I am SO looking forward to the peace of mind from that extra protection. I'm not convinced the vaccine will be effective against all new variants of the virus, so I'll still be cautious when out and about. 

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Cheryl Varner

@Leela Corman Hi Leela, I so agree with you and others about being careful and taking the vaccine.  I had my first Pfizer vaccination on February 17 with only mild soreness at the injection site afterwards.  Yesterday, I received my second shot and I feel fine today and only have mild soreness again.  I got emotional after both shots.  I feel so grateful to be living in a country where these vaccines are available.  And, since I am retired I don't have to do all the hand washing and worrying that some of you have had to deal with, since you are around other people all day.

 

I don't really understand why so many people don't want to take the vaccination...but, I can only deal with me, my body, my children...or those I am around.  My clinic is just beginning to set up appointments; however, my sister in law alerted me to the fact that the health clinics of Cook County, Illinois were giving vaccinations and had open spots. I got in right away because of my age.   When I went for the first shot, the clinic was packed.  However, since Chicago has opened more clinics and is doing mass vaccinations at United Center, where sports events take place, I didn't have to wait at all. The whole process took less than 30 minutes.

 

Like you Leela, I didn't always take the flu shot.  However, last year, my physician actually called me and encouraged me to take it and so I did.  I didn't even have to go into the clinic; they had patients drive to a small parking lot next to the main building and the nurses came out to our cars to vaccinate us.  

 

I must admit that I am looking forward to being able to spend time with my fully vaccinated girlfriends!

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Deborah Turnor

Received mine yesterday at the Safeway’s Pharmacy. It’s the Moderna. I am 60, I took my 91 year old MIL in also. I live in Placer County, Ca.  which is a horrible place to live with all the White Supremacist,, it’s not at all like the beach were we lived 4 years ago.

 

For myself I had chills an hour after the immunization then later body aches. My MIL nothing.

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Tincha
4 hours ago, Leela Corman said:

Regarding our bodies and choices: getting vaccinations is an act of citizenship, and a matter of public health. It's not just about an individual and whether you yourself seem to never get whatever's going around. We're around other people. We work with, live with, ride transportation with, shop with other people. We all have a responsibility to protect one another. Our choices about our bodies end where other people's safety begins.


Thank you! 

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Connor

I sent an application to my city's health department, but I am not in any of the higher-risk groups, so it will probably be a while before I hear back.

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petra

Every place is booked out till late spring, where I live, and all of them are quite some miles away, so I am hanging out there in the wild on my beautiful hilltop, it is not a big deal for me though, I have all I need, without going anywhere. Maybe in Summer something opens up.

 

I wish that all of you who have to live in cramped spaces with a lot of people, and those who are working in services that include a lot of contact with others, get your shots soon.

 

I am saddened that the production and therefore distribution on a global scale is having so much difficulty, based on an outdated model that doesn't just share freely, even if they could, even in a crisis, all is going "business as usual"!

 

The first Covid-19 vaccine was administered on the 8th of December 2020. This set in motion a global vaccine apartheid: By the 22nd of January, no Western vaccines had been administered on the African continent.

The UK had vaccinated 478,248 people and the US 975,540 people by this date. It is projected that less than 1 out of every 10 people in the Global South will be vaccinated by the end of 2021. So far, 0.02% of people on the African continent are vaccinated.

Vaccine nationalism may offer hope for the wealthy, but it brings disaster for the Global South.

Despite these growing international disparities, the West shows no sign of changing course. Days after the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a global pandemic, big pharma rejected a proposal for a global 'tech access pool,' that promised international access to vaccine data. This would have allowed the Global South to produce their own vaccinations, using technologies developed in the Global North.

What's more, Western governments are unprepared to share their boon of vaccines with the Global South.

The best way to beat COVID-19 is to achieve global — not national — herd immunity.
 

 

 

 

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Wendy

I'm 61 and on Monday it was announced that I would be eligible here in FL starting 3/15.  I am almost beside myself  with excitement because it means I'll perhaps be able to see my 89 year old mother by May.  I'm signed up with the health department to get a call when there's a slot for me and I guess I will also try for the "lottery" at the stores.  I'll get whichever one comes first.  I just read that J&J vaccine means FL gets 200,000 more vaccines every week now. 

 

My mother in MA just got her first shot 2/27.  My sister who lives near her has no idea when she will be able to get it.  I have 2 nieces who are in their 20s who live in Israel and they are both fully vaccinated.  They both had pretty bad reactions to their second shots so I guess age and health don't really figure in to the equation.  One had bad body pains, the other had a very high fever.  We are all aiming to be together in August for my mother's 90th birthday and I will go before then though if I'm vaccinated.  We all have been afraid that my mother will die before then but she is a tough old Warrior who has survived numerous bouts of cancer and heart problems.  I think she is staying alive just to see her grand kids again though she would like to not have a funeral and I've been a little afraid that she'd choose Covid time to die so we wouldn't be able to have one. 

 

And I absolutely agree with @Leela Corman about public health and our responsibilities as world citizens.

 

@petra I share your concerns and I also wanted to share that I read yesterday there's a bit of a Covid-19 mystery in Africa and Asia because the death rates have been so low there.  This info was in a NYT newsletter that I could send to you if you want.  It was based mostly I think on this article in The New Yorker which may be behind a paywall.

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Janet H

Got my first vaccine dose today in Florida. Moderna. So did my niece, who is 21. She's in California. The supply and availability in the U.S. is really increasing.

Biden has said that we have enough vaccine available for all American adults to be vaccinated by mid-May. Then of course the studies on children still need to be completed before kids have access to it. And, we need to make sure the whole world's population has access to vaccines asap, not only for everyone's well-being but also because the more people who go unvaccinated, the more variants arise, and the longer we are in a pandemic.

This is the main problem that I see with people opting out of a vaccine. They may think it's "my body, my choice." But actually as long as a significant percentage of people opt out of being vaccinated, we are all going to remain stuck in a very bad situation for an indefinite length of time, with significant consequences. Ongoing precautions, more deaths, more booster shots, etc. We have a problem with that here in the U.S. at the moment.

This is apart from the fact that these individuals may infect others who really cannot take the vaccine (like pregnant and nursing women, because this has not been studied) or who are extremely vulnerable, even with a vaccination.

Edited by Janet H
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Janet H
2 hours ago, petra said:

The best way to beat COVID-19 is to achieve global — not national — herd immunity.
 

Totally agree with this, @petra. It's absolutely true.

Edited by Janet H
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Mike Cleverly

I had my first dose of the Pfizer vaccine at work (an NHS Hospital in the UK) in January this year. My job involves being in close contact with suspected, confirmed covid positive, and deceased covid patients.

 

I had a sore arm then a whole range of mild side effects, nausea, headache, tiredness, which was unpleasant but soon passed.

 

I'm due to have my second dose on the 27th of March.

 

My wife managed to get her first dose a few weeks ago due to being in the police. One of the vaccination centres rings up the police whenever they have a few unused shots at the end of the day - she was lucky enough to be able to get there that day before closing time. 

 

My sister and my mum were two people whose health made them at high risk of suffering badly with Covid, they've both had a shot. Now my Dad has had a shot too. So there's a lot of weight off our minds now.

 

Getting this vaccine out to people is one of the few things our government are doing well - mostly because they simply buy the vaccine and hand it to the NHS, who have been giving vaccines for years, so they know exactly how to handle this kind of thing.

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RachelL
On 3/9/2021 at 8:20 PM, Juni said:

    I leave my mask on in the car because it's easier just not to touch it once it's on in order to stay hygienic.   

 

Exactly, @Juni! I do the same. I've heard people say that those who wear masks while driving alone are stupid, but no, that is far from the truth; there is a good rationale behind it.

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Diane
25 minutes ago, RachelL said:

 

Exactly, @Juni! I do the same. I've heard people say that those who wear masks while driving alone are stupid, but no, that is far from the truth; there is a good rationale behind it.

Ditto.

I wear a mask in my car and leave it on till I’m home again. I’m at high risk and only go out when I have to. 

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Connie Stansell-Foy
9 hours ago, petra said:

What's more, Western governments are unprepared to share their boon of vaccines with the Global South.

President Biden said today that if there is a surplus of US vaccines - and I expect there will be - they will be provided to other countries. No doubt it will not be enough, but I hope they continue to produce vaccines even after the US is not in such need of them for our own citizens. President Biden made a point of noting that until everyone in every country is vaccinated, we will not have defeated the virus.

 

@petra, you're in Washington, close to the west coast, right? You can find locations in Washington where the vaccine is available here: https://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/Immunization/VaccineLocations
I got mine at Consistent Care Services, and they had it down to a routine; they've been at it long enough that the whole thing ran like a well-oiled machine. I recommend checking for appointment spots every Monday, as I think they get new supplies in like on Monday mornings. I made my appointment on a Monday and was able to have my appointment on that Wednesday, so I got in fast, too.

Anyone else in Washington who's eligible, I highly recommend this website for finding a place near you to get the vaccine. 
 

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Marvin Wilkins

I'm in British Columbia and I'm not due until September they are just starting with the 90 years but I might wait till January and get the J&J one and done.

With the uncertainty of logistics here in BC Canada I'm OK with waiting a while.

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Faye

I am in New Mexico, USA. I have not gotten the shot, but I am scheduled to get my first dose on March 17th. Apparently, I will be getting the Moderna version.

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Caitlin

In southeast Pennsylvania. I received both doses of the Pfizer vaccine in January. I work in a high-risk retirement community, and the healthcare staff were given the opportunity to get the vaccine as early as January 6 (which is when I got mine). I had no side effects/symptoms except arm soreness. 
 

Now speaking for the residents of the retirement community, all of whom are at high-risk, above 65, and most have health conditions combined with corona would be a nuke to their system...because they live in an independent lifestyle community (meaning we don’t have nurse aids on our side of the building who help the residents regularly) they have had the worst accessibility to the vaccine. Over half of the residents are still not vaccinated nor know how to receive the vaccination. There are different ways of receiving it in this area, so I’ve heard through talk and light research, but it’s really a horribly messy and confusing process for everyone. 
 

My family - mostly older aunts and uncles - are all working towards receiving their vaccinations. But my mom has the clear gateway to getting vaccinated (she’s 63 but works at a private practice for pain management) but she’s waiting for J&J’s vaccine. Some weird conspiracy theories have burrowed into her head about Pfizer and Moderna (the two that she would be eligible for receiving because she works in healthcare). It’s incredibly frustrating to try to convince her otherwise. Not to get too into it, but she’s been socializing all this time with friends who will see her, and this has been without masks on. Luckily she hasn’t ever caught the virus. And her mindset is that it’s “just another version of the flu.” But it really isn’t. She acts very irresponsibly. I think I’ve been HER mother in several past lives lol. 
 

I hope everyone who has access to the vaccines does receive them. We’re moving forward, and we must continue to do so. 

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Patty

I got my first moderna shot on Wednesday, in Salinas CA. Get my second on April 7th.

 
My arm was pretty sore, and I felt like such a baby whenever I bumped it that first night, but no major issues.
 

The process to get vaccines in Monterey County is unorganized and frustrating. Similar to what @DianeHB and @petra described. I signed up for MyTurn.gov.ca and never heard back from them. At first I figured I would just wait and let older/high risk people get their shots first, but started looking for appointments when the governor announced plans to reopen schools in April. I don’t know what’s going to happen, but I want to be prepared! Luckily a smaller school district in the area was able to secure the vaccine for their staff and had extra. Otherwise, I’d probably be driving a few hours away to get a shot, or spending my evenings popping into clinics at 6pm to see if they had any leftovers! 
 

My 94 year old grandma is fully vaccinated with Pfizer, no side effects whatsoever. My mom is a nurse and also got Pfizer, about 8 hours after the second shot she felt pretty bad, but felt fine the next day. 

 

My brother is also eligible to get the vaccine since he works in the Agriculture industry as a food producer. He was on board with the vaccine initially, but has suddenly become hesitant. He is being influenced (brain washed) by his super conservative boss. I’m sure he’ll get it sooner or later, but it’s frustrating that he would even entertain such a reckless idea. My whole family is up in arms about it! 

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