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AnnaD

 

@Leela Corman thank you for saying what you have said about individual choice and public health responsibilities. You could have been a health professional in Public Health/Epidemiology with that well put together rationale. 

 

I will probably steal your speech on individual choice vs Public Health if you don't mind. You speak for me too. 

 

I had my first vaccine of Pfizer last week, and I had a headache, insomnia, no body ache, but I puked about 6 times, but, there very well could have been other reasons for the headache/insomnia/pukeyguts other than the vaccine. Assignment stress etc. I am fine now but I would be lying if I said that the second Pfizer vaccine isn't scaring me (in terms of reactions, but I will drink a cup of concrete and harden up and quit bitching, because, you know, life is a gift when you get a vaccine that works and protects others) so I will see how I go. I am trying to get the bulk part of an assignment done now over easter prior to my second Pfizer vaccine just in case. 

 

Cool thread.

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I got my first vaccination recently and made me wonder who else has received their vaccination, either in part of full.   Let us know:   if you have received yours where yo

LOL, I do think this is particularly funny that you are laissez-faire about dying, but express fear of the very unlikelihood of metaphorically being burned at the stake but no concerns about the very

I'm in Providence, Rhode Island, which is apparently doing a very good job of running its vaccination program. I'm not yet eligible, as I'm 48 and have no comorbidities. My doctor tells me she thinks

45 minutes ago, Tom said:

I received my 2nd Moderna shot March 29th.  By noon the next day I was suffering from terrible chills.  I only felt okay after wrapping myself in 3 layers of blankets.  But I was fine by Wednesday.  I don't quite feel 100% yet (still have a slight headache and fatigue), but the difference between how I feel now and how I felt the day after the 2nd shot was huge.  I hope this information helps! 

Don't forget the very non-scholar symptom of waxing sentimental to your long term partner. 😉

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Luciana Flora

The progress of vaccination here in Brazil depends on the state where you live.

  my father is 71 years old and took the first dose on Tuesday .. my mother said that if everything goes according to schedule she will be vaccinated on April 9th.


Some people are having difficulties to get vaccinated because the government is a bit slow to get the vaccines and the doses end quickly.

For the time being in Brazil about 9% of the population has been vaccinated.

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Tom
28 minutes ago, Kat said:

Don't forget the very non-scholar symptom of waxing sentimental to your long term partner. 😉

 

This is what happens when you wrap your electric blanket around my cold scholar heart. 😅

Edited by Tom
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8 minutes ago, Tom said:

 

This is what happens when you wrap your electric blanket around my cold scholar heart. 😅

Sounds like you could be a covid vaccine, long-hauler sentimentalist

Edited by Kat
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RachelL

Got my first Pfizer shot yesterday- had a couple waves of tiredness and arm soreness in the evening, but not too bad. Today, however, when I woke up I felt really run-down and it was a bit hard to function. Then, miraculously, my walk in the cold seemed to have dissipated a lot of the lethargy and mental fogginess. Glad to have turned the corner.

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Juni

My state recently announced that everyone will be allowed a vaccine a few weeks from now. I'm both excited and nervous, as someone with post viral issues. This will either massively change my life for the better and this awful year will be soon not much more than a memory, or a confirmation that my current state is my new normal and I need to see about adjusting to that for the long term. 

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petra

After months in Washington State to get an appointment for vaccination in the remote area I live in, I finally broke through.

"The nighttime is the right time" I woke up in the middle of the night, got online, and did what I did for months at daytime (trying to get an appointment), and BOOM, I have an appointment mid next week, I will have to drive some miles, but hey just to cool, I am so grateful.

In 6 weeks I can take care of stuff I would not have dared to do without being vaccinated, of course still mask etc. in doing so, but what a relief it will be!

I wish that the US shares the 1 Billion vaccines they have, with the rest of our Globe!

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Kathryn41

I just noticed this topic.  I received my first Moderna vaccine  1 pm January 13 and my 2nd Moderna 1 pm Feb 9th. 

 

I had virtually no real reaction to the first shot - a little bit of warmth and swelling that passed within a few hours - I didn't even feel the needle go on.  The second shot was different.  I didn't feel the shot again, and at no time in the hours or days that followed did my arm hurt or even get warm or swollen. 

 

I did some yard work after I got back from getting the shot as they suggested exercising after the shot was good and I felt a bit stiff by dinner time.  I figured at first it was from doing the yard work,  and I went to bed early.  I woke up at 1:30 am  with my thigh in the most horrible cramp that I have ever had. I was in agony!  When I tried to stand up to work out the cramp, I couldn't stand and collapsed on the floor.  I lay there for about 10 minutes, crying and in pain,  before I was able to slowly crawl/drag myself  to the bathroom where I could pull myself up on the counter.   My husband is deaf without his hearing aids and was not able to hear me calling him.  😞  I have medication for cramping and was able to get to it, but by this time I noted that  it felt like every bone in my body was broken! I was sure my ribs and sternum were going to just fall apart - just taking a breath hurt.  I was so weak it was all I could do to make it back into bed where I couldn't get comfortable and kept tossing and turning - and trying to stop further cramping.  I had a low grade fever -  it never went above 99.9 - but as I am also diabetic, even though my glucose levels weren't badly elevated - never went above 170 -  I was still fighting ketones.  I kept upping my  insulin to keep myself out of ketoacidosis and ended up needing a lot more insulin than usual.  I kept drinking Power Aid Zero to try to rebalance my electrolytes but couldn't eat anything.  My husband had to do the morning animal chores as I couldn't even stand let alone walk. 

 

By about 4 that afternoon, things started to improve.  The ibuprofen started to work, shortly after the pain went away and pretty well by 30 hours after the shot I was fine and back to normal - fever gone, blood glucose levels good, ketones gone, pain gone and I able to move and stand again as if nothing had happened.

 

My husband who also received his shots at the same time as me had no real side effects for either shot.  His arm felt warm but didn't hurt, and he did feel a 'little' nauseous 3 days after the 2nd shot but he was never sure if it was related to the shot or something else as it passed quite quickly.  

 

I did report my side effects to the vsafe program at CDC and am still updating my experience weeks/months later:-).  I have had no further symptoms.

 

You know what?  It was all worth it!  The relief of knowing I am no longer at the mercy of some stupid idiot who refuses to practice basic safety protocols (which include a large segment of the population here in Georgia) has been astounding.

 

I am still practicing all my safety protocols but it is such a relief knowing that I am now fully vaccinated.

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BrianW

I got my first shot of the Pfizer vaccine on March 31st. My arm has felt rather sore for the past 48 hours, much like after a few good full-contact sparring matches in my taekwondo classes. Otherwise, no observable symptoms. I've got the second shot scheduled for April 21st and plan to take off the day after, as I've heard it can induce flu-like symptoms for 24 hours... bleh. But, it's worth it to get over this.

 

My mom received hers a few months ago since she works in a school cafeteria and my sister and her daughter are refusing to take it on medical grounds.... Sigh.

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Jeroen

@AnnaD Thank you for your caring message. I had fever through early this morning. It then cleared up. The fever peaked at 100.4 yesterday. I have mostly fatigue and a mild headache today.

 

@Rosario Thank you for sending me the healing energy. I hope that the vaccine availability and distribution improves so that you and your family can have access to those vaccines sooner rather than later.

 

@Tom Thank you for sharing your experience. You were right that the symptoms mostly cleared up the next day. I am feeling quite a bit better today compared to yesterday even as I am still feeling the need to sleep more. I had the chills yesteday too.

 

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Eric

I got my first shot of Pfizer on Wednesday, same day as @BrianW. Also had the same result, sore shoulder for about 24 hours, and a little fatigue, but otherwise no major reactions. My second is scheduled the same as Brian and I also scheduled to have the next day off of work just in case it does end up being more intense.

 

I read that if you already had COVID, then your first shot (or only one if you get Johnson & Johnson) is potentially the more intense/symptomatic one, since your immune system is already primed to respond. More robust immune systems are also more likely to experience some symptoms compared to immunocompromised individuals (again due to immune response).

 

All things considered, getting through a possible bout of symptoms is preferable to dealing with the possible complications of getting sick.

 

Lol, I had a client who told me that she used to be one of the people that thought "Oh, it's just like flu. It's no worse than that." Then she got the flu and experienced just how rough that was. And she was like, "I learned. I'll never think that again."

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Janet

Just wanted to say that I had my second vaccine shot on March 16 so I am now officially protected. 

 

Colorado still has a mask mandate, and at this stage I think I'd feel uncomfortable being without a mask anywhere just because I'm so used to the face covering. However, I still feel like I've been freed.

 

Unlike many of my friends, I have stayed away from all stores since last March except for the rare occasion when there was just no other choice to complete a required errand. I'm older, and have some health issues that made me higher risk, so I didn't take any unnecessary risks. Unlike a few of my friends, at least one of whom got covid as a result. 

 

So, I've delivered packages to UPS, for example, but I haven't been in a grocery store since February 2020. (And likely won't go anytime soon. I'm fairly addicted to ordering groceries online and having them delivered. And strangely, even with the delivery fee and a hefty tip, the planning required to do online orders has saved me money over the year. I just wish I could get them to bring the groceries inside and put them away. lol)  (P.S. I shop for groceries at King Soopers, the same company -- not the same store -- where the Boulder shootings took place recently. Brings home the nightmare to picture those familiar aisles and imagine a shooter being there with me.)

 

Anyhow, now I can make plans to meet also-vaccinated friends for a glass of wine or run into a store to grab a last-minute item without feeling like I'm gambling on my health. I can even shop for clothes now! 

 

I heard the other day that the vaccine is effective for at least 6 months. Only 6 months?! Maybe people will get wise and get vaccinated so there won't be a need to go back into isolation by the end of the year. 

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Diane

Thank you @Troy and everyone for the information you are providing on your experiences with the vaccines. I was able to book an appointment for my vaccine next Sunday, April 11 at a hospital here in Toronto. It will likely be the Pfizer vaccine. My husband had his first Pfizer vaccine last week and hasn't had any side effects.

 

A friend told me some encouraging news about how effective our vaccines can be. Her 94-year-old grandmother in Montreal had her first Pfizer vaccine and three weeks later her caregiver tested positive for COVID (with a variant). Her grandmother also tested positive but she was asymptomatic.

This was with one shot!

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John

Huzzah!  Got my second Pfizer shot yesterday.  Now to wait ~12 days for my immune system to get to full strength as a result of the vaccine then I'll be ready to host movie-nights for my friends again.  Well, ready to host "in person" movie nights again that is!  Been doing livestream-hosting movie nights for friends for the past year.  Naturally I'm still going to be doing the whole "mask" thing when out and about.  Playing it safe.

 

So far minimal reactions on my part -- feeling a little tired and fuzzy headed, which may well just be the changing weather around here.

 

May y'all be able to get the vaccine you want, when you want it, with no-to-minimal side effects, and may you and yours stay (or become) healthy and well! 

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AnnH
On 3/10/2021 at 9:45 AM, Leela Corman said:

I'm in Providence, Rhode Island, which is apparently doing a very good job of running its vaccination program. I'm not yet eligible, as I'm 48 and have no comorbidities. My doctor tells me she thinks I'll likely be eligible in May. I can't wait.

 

Regarding our bodies and choices: getting vaccinations is an act of citizenship, and a matter of public health. It's not just about an individual and whether you yourself seem to never get whatever's going around. We're around other people. We work with, live with, ride transportation with, shop with other people. We all have a responsibility to protect one another. Our choices about our bodies end where other people's safety begins. It makes zero impact on others if I take headache medicine, have an abortion, have reiki or acupuncture or plastic surgery. But it sure makes a difference if I'm an asymptomatic carrier of a disease I could have been vaccinated for, and I unwittingly pass it on to my neighbor, or my kid, or your mom when I sit next to her on the train. We would never have licked smallpox if people had decided that the vaccination for it was just a matter of personal choice. Can you imagine a world where smallpox was still rampant, with the way we travel?

 

Older cemeteries are full of the graves of children. Take a walk through them sometime, and note the years and ages of their deaths, then correlate that to epidemics of our past. As a person who has held the corpse of her own child, I do not recommend this type of loss. A shot in your arm is at best a momentary inconvenience. The death of your loved ones ruins your life.

 

I used to brush off the influenza vaccine, because I so rarely got it. But I have become religious about it, since my last pregnancy, and I'm glad, because in 2018 I got a flu so bad that if I hadn't been vaccinated, I would very possibly have died. I found that out after the fact, from my doctor, who told me that year's had been the most virulent since 1918, with a high fatality rate. The flu shot doesn't always keep you from getting sick, but it prevents the worst complications, such as pneumonia and death. Plus you can take a cute flu shot selfie and show off your muscular arm with a hot bandaid on it. I cannot wait to do this with my covid vax, I am a vaccine ho.

I am very late to this party and response, but I just read this and want to thank you for clarifying that this isn't personal only. Would that it were! It is a public health issue. My great-grandmother lost 3 siblings in 2 weeks from diphtheria. My mother's close friend gave birth while in an iron lung due to polio. My mother's friend died. Her daughter lived. My older siblings and I all had measles, mumps chicken pox--all the childhood diseases. 3 kids under the age of five and all sick with illnesses that now have vaccines--yikes! My parents couldn't line us up fast enough for the polio vaccine.

 

I wear my smallpox vaccine scar proudly. I wear it because generations after me have never had to have the vaccine.

 

ETA: AND I GET MY SECOND PFIZER SHOT NEXT MONDAY!

Edited by AnnH
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NickF

Received both doses of Moderna vaccine here in California. Got the first dose mid-February and the second mid-March. Glad that more people are able to be vaccinated now. Encouraging all reluctant people to get the vaccine. 

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Crystal

Got my first dose of Pfizer this AM in the Bay Area! Side effects so far: slightly sore arm, a little fatigue, and a powerful craving for hash browns. A grub hub order is on its way! 

 

All my friends in the Bay Area got Pfizer; I think they must ship batches of a particular vaccine to different areas. My second dose will be on the 27th.

 

I didn’t become eligible until April because of my age and because I do not have a public facing or essential worker job - and that’s OK, the most vulnerable needed it first. But I hope everyone who can get the vax will do so now that eligibility is opening up. Herd immunity is so important. Enough people have died already.

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Maureen

Reporting from Toronto, Canada, I got my first Pfizer shot today. The second shot is scheduled for July 28.

 

After admission, as I was waiting in line for the vaccine, I looked around me and found myself, surprisingly, in awe. I started to cry but stopped myself as I didn't want anyone to think something was wrong and come over to help me. It was a large, simple, quiet space, warehouse-like, and I could see all these people, every shade of colour, from all over the world, some looking after others, doing paperwork, administering the vaccines, etc., and others receiving the tender care (that's what it felt like) of vaccination to protect themselves and others from COVID 19. In that moment, I was struck. I felt so much love for humanity. Whether we realize it or not, we are all working together, cooperatively, to move us through a once in a lifetime global pandemic.  

 

For those curious as to why we are spacing out our second doses to 16 weeks, it has to do with supply. Here's some current information.

 

A single vaccine dose clearly reduces COVID-19 infection, hospitalization, and death. When supplied to a wide enough population, transmission is also curtailed. Although there is a lack of data to directly support a 16-week gap compared to shorter intervals, in the current setting of vaccine scarcity, it appears reasonable to accept the risk of an extended dosing interval in order to more rapidly provide protection to a greater proportion of the population. Vigilance will be key in determining whether this practice can continue safely while vaccine supply is limited; if the extended gap is found to put those waiting for dose 2 at excessive risk, then a shorter interval would need to be reconsidered.

 

The following high-priority groups will continue to receive the vaccine at the initial recommended intervals (21 days for Pfizer-BioNTech and 28 days for Moderna):

  • Residents of long-term care homes, retirement homes, elder care lodges and assisted living facilities
  • Remote and isolated First Nation communities (currently supported by Operation Remote Immunity)

From Dr. Helena Swinkels, Office of the Chief Medical Officer in British Columbia: "Current research in BC and elsewhere confirms that vaccine effectiveness continues for at least two months after the first dose. And vaccine science shows that once good vaccine protection is established, immunity does not suddenly disappear but rather weakens gradually. It also shows that longer intervals between first and second doses do not compromise the booster response and in fact often produce higher antibody levels in the long term.

 

All of this means that we can be confident that extending the interval between the first and second doses to 16 weeks will provide good protection to those who are vaccinated, both in the short and the long term.

 

The biggest advantage from delaying second doses by 16 weeks is that it allows us to immunize more people even faster.

 

In BC, the change to 16 weeks means every First Nations community in the province is on target to get first-dose immunization by the end of March. Meanwhile, urban-and-away-from-home (off-reserve) populations can expect to see their timelines moved up by as much as two months."

 

Here's another excerpt from a recent article from a Toronto new station: "Dr. Anna Banerji, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Toronto, told CTV News Channel on Tuesday that other provinces should follow British Columbia's move to extend the interval of vaccine doses up to 16 weeks given Canada's limited vaccine supply.

 

“I think it makes sense," Banerji said. "The ultimate goal is to maximize life and reduce suffering and the way we do that is by getting as much vaccine out to as many people as possible.”

 

Banerji explained that the first dose of a vaccine gives a person immunity, while the second dose is for longevity.

 

"So if you give [the second dose] in one month, two months, it really doesn't make a difference as long as as many people as possible get the vaccine," she said.

 

Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) announced on Wednesday that it is now recommending that jurisdictions extend the interval of the second dose up to four months when supplies are limited. NACI said in a statement online that extending the dose interval will help maximize "opportunities for protection of the entire adult population within a short timeframe."

 

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Juni
42 minutes ago, Maureen said:

Reporting from Toronto, Canada, I got my first Pfizer shot today. The second shot is scheduled for July 28.

 

After admission, as I was waiting in line for the vaccine, I looked around me and found myself, surprisingly, in awe. I started to cry but stopped myself as I didn't want anyone to think something was wrong and come over to help me. It was a large, simple, quiet space, warehouse-like, and I could see all these people, every shade of colour, from all over the world, some looking after others, doing paperwork, administering the vaccines, etc., and others receiving the tender care (that's what it felt like) of vaccination to protect themselves and others from COVID 19. In that moment, I was struck. I felt so much love for humanity. Whether we realize it or not, we are all working together, cooperatively, to move us through a once in a lifetime global pandemic.  

 

For those curious as to why we are spacing out our second doses to 16 weeks, it has to do with supply. Here's some current information.

 

A single vaccine dose clearly reduces COVID-19 infection, hospitalization, and death. When supplied to a wide enough population, transmission is also curtailed. Although there is a lack of data to directly support a 16-week gap compared to shorter intervals, in the current setting of vaccine scarcity, it appears reasonable to accept the risk of an extended dosing interval in order to more rapidly provide protection to a greater proportion of the population. Vigilance will be key in determining whether this practice can continue safely while vaccine supply is limited; if the extended gap is found to put those waiting for dose 2 at excessive risk, then a shorter interval would need to be reconsidered.

 

The following high-priority groups will continue to receive the vaccine at the initial recommended intervals (21 days for Pfizer-BioNTech and 28 days for Moderna):

  • Residents of long-term care homes, retirement homes, elder care lodges and assisted living facilities
  • Remote and isolated First Nation communities (currently supported by Operation Remote Immunity)

From Dr. Helena Swinkels, Office of the Chief Medical Officer in British Columbia: "Current research in BC and elsewhere confirms that vaccine effectiveness continues for at least two months after the first dose. And vaccine science shows that once good vaccine protection is established, immunity does not suddenly disappear but rather weakens gradually. It also shows that longer intervals between first and second doses do not compromise the booster response and in fact often produce higher antibody levels in the long term.

 

All of this means that we can be confident that extending the interval between the first and second doses to 16 weeks will provide good protection to those who are vaccinated, both in the short and the long term.

 

The biggest advantage from delaying second doses by 16 weeks is that it allows us to immunize more people even faster.

 

In BC, the change to 16 weeks means every First Nations community in the province is on target to get first-dose immunization by the end of March. Meanwhile, urban-and-away-from-home (off-reserve) populations can expect to see their timelines moved up by as much as two months."

 

Here's another excerpt from a recent article from a Toronto new station: "Dr. Anna Banerji, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Toronto, told CTV News Channel on Tuesday that other provinces should follow British Columbia's move to extend the interval of vaccine doses up to 16 weeks given Canada's limited vaccine supply.

 

“I think it makes sense," Banerji said. "The ultimate goal is to maximize life and reduce suffering and the way we do that is by getting as much vaccine out to as many people as possible.”

 

Banerji explained that the first dose of a vaccine gives a person immunity, while the second dose is for longevity.

 

"So if you give [the second dose] in one month, two months, it really doesn't make a difference as long as as many people as possible get the vaccine," she said.

 

Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) announced on Wednesday that it is now recommending that jurisdictions extend the interval of the second dose up to four months when supplies are limited. NACI said in a statement online that extending the dose interval will help maximize "opportunities for protection of the entire adult population within a short timeframe."

 

You could have cried without incident. A lot of people are reporting spontaneous tears once they get their jab-I imagine the providers are used to it by now. 

 Glad you are on the way to greater safety!

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Sam K

Getting the Johnson & Johnson after work today. Fingers crossed for few-to-no side effects; I've never really experienced side effects from vaccines before, so hopefully this is little different.

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Marigold

In my country many people are refusing to get vaccinated because the only vaccine that's available to the large majority is Oxford-AstraZeneca and almost everyone among those want to get vaccinate prefer an mRNA vaccine-Pfizer or Moderna, but especially Pfizer for some reason. We even have old people in risk groups refusing the AstraZeneca when it could be life saving for them. Enthusiasm for AstraZeneca was low from the beginning but now with the rare side effect of potentially fatal blood clotting (which was yesterday officially confirmed by the European Medicines Agency as a side effect of the vaccine and it's an autoimmune reaction), even fewer people are willing to get it.

 

The truth is that the mRNA vaccines remain a luxury item here that only people with connections can receive-lawyers and such. When there is no segregation based on who gets a vaccine and who doesn't, there is  segregation on who gets the ''best'' vaccine and who gets the ''lesser'' one.  This goes for poor vs richer countries too. Of course, the main point of vaccination should be to prevent death and severe complications and any of the ones available would do that.

 

If anyone gets the AstraZeneca vaccine on TLE, please write how you felt after it, by the way. I'm beginning to think that I will be one of the few TLE-ers to recieve this vaccine and that makes me feel kind of alone in a certain way.

 

I'm also going to leave this video here:

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Luciana Flora
9 minutes ago, Marigold said:

If anyone gets the AstraZeneca vaccine on TLE, please write how you felt after it, by the way. I'm beginning to think that I will be one of the few TLE-ers to recieve this vaccine and that makes me feel kind of alone in a certain way

I didn't get this vaccine, but I know people who get it.

 In Brazil, the first ones to get vaccinated took the coronavc (Vaccine produced in China. It was the first vaccine that was available here .. As I was vaccinated in the first batch I took Coronavc ..

 Then AstraZeca came .. some of my co-workers got this vaccine .. from what i saw no one had any serious problems with this vaccine .. some had some reaction but it was mild ...

 At the moment I think it is just these two vaccines that are being distributed here .. Brazil took a long time to buy the vaccines and now it is having difficulties to buy more ..

From what I'm seeing in the US it's quite early ... because new people are saying they got the vaccine ...


My father is 71 years old and did not get the vaccine until the end of March. My 64-year-old mother has not yet taken it ... For the calendar she will get the vaccine on April 9th .. but not guaranteed because she has everything postponed because the vaccine ends ..

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