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Education in the mature paradigm


chamomile
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Hello, I was wondering what education in the mature paradigm might be like (structure, subjects, grades). Any ideas? Thank you.

Edited by chamomile
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Michael was asked over the years about Education, not so much about Education in the mature paradigm, but about their viewpoint and interest of Education itself, from a Michael perspective. Like this-one:

Michael Speaks: The Essence Of Children

By Bobby ,
February 24, 2019 in 2019 Michael Speaks, which links you also to Michael Speaks: Education

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Oh I love this topic ūüôā¬†I think I read somewhere that mature souls generally prefer to learn more self-directed than younger souls. Eg they pick the topic they want to know about and get information themselves. Not sure where I‚Äôve seen this, but I can imagine¬†it.

 

I can see a similar system like Montessori learning in a mature soul paradigm. It¬†is¬†a more organic¬†way of learning. There‚Äôs not so much¬†frontal lesson learning but children can move freer around than in ‚Äėnormal‚Äô¬†schools. They get a topic and can choose how they gather information (eg written, via photography, Internet, digital presentation, films, books etc). It‚Äôs much more¬†tailored to how¬†the individual¬†learns than the ‚Äėone size fits all‚Äô approach lot of schools do. They make learning fun. And¬†that‚Äôs¬†how people naturally learn.

Montessori schools also expect parents to help out, it’s more directly community focused, Democratic.

 

i think the main subjects will stay with a bigger focus on well-being, emotions, mental health, health in general. They make sure nobody is left behind, it’s more inclusive.

 

I could imagine a system where AI picks up where a kid stands and offers them individualised learning programs.

I could see lesson starting times adjusted to kids/students needs (eg early birds start earlier, night owls later, core times for all). Everything more flexible and less rigid. Less punishment more encouragement, focus on the positives. Bullying: will be dealt with and resolved.

 

i think Bristol, where I live,¬†is mid to late mature. In my son‚Äôs school (primary, with a most likely mature priest/sage head)¬†they put a lot of emphasis on emotions, kindness, helpfulness and positive social interaction. How to be more environmentally conscious, focus on¬†racial injustice,¬†healthy nutrition.¬†A lot of¬†kids in my sons class are now¬†vegetarians, pescatarians etc. Amazing Gen Z ūüíú

it’s a normal state school, nothing special btw.

 

The only thing is maybe, he came the other day to me and explained that his school is sexist because they are nicer to girls than boys….. which is true unfortunately. Hopefully that will be different, too in the future.

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Not exactly about mature soul world, but gives some hints as to where it might head.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Sorry for the disturbance, but could someone please teach me how to tag someone? Thank you very much for the help!ūüėÖ

Edited by chamomile
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One of the weak areas I see in education both through traditional schooling and into training provided by the work force is that there is not anywhere near enough emphasis placed on applying knowledge gained or in other words having hands on experience working alongside people who do have experience in what you are learning about. I have been asked to take highly accelerated training classes where I would go through a book in a short time frame without ever having had a chance to apply what I have learned in any meaningful way.

 

The assumption is made by management that if you take such a class that you are automatically an expert in that topic. In reality, that is not how learning works. You can read endless numbers of book and articles but without having the ability to apply that knowledge in your life in some meaningful way, all that knowledge is fairly useless.

 

I would like to see an approach towards learning that includes moving at a much slower pace or with much more patience so that one has the opportunity to have a true comprehension of what is learned through applying knowledge gained. That might look like going through a single chapter in a book, then having the time and patience towards applying that knowledge through hands on experience and with the help of instructors who specialize in what you are learning about. Every person learns in unique ways and at different paces so the learning would have to be accommodating of that.

 

Like with any art, it takes time and patience through experience to become skilled at that art. Reading a few books in an accelerated manner is not going to get you to that point. Through applying knowledge that is gained, one can gain more knowledge.

Edited by Jeroen
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1 hour ago, Jeroen said:

One of the weak areas I see in education both through traditional schooling and into training provided by the work force is that there is not anywhere near enough emphasis placed on applying knowledge gained or in other words having hands on experience working alongside people who do have experience in what you are learning about. I have been asked to take highly accelerated training classes where I would go through a book in a short time frame without ever having had a chance to apply what I have learned in any meaningful way.

 

The assumption is made by management that if you take such a class that you are automatically an expert in that topic. In reality, that is not how learning works. You can read endless numbers of book and articles but without having the ability to apply that knowledge in your life in some meaningful way, all that knowledge is fairly useless.

 

I would like to see an approach towards learning that includes moving at a much slower pace or with much more patience so that one has the opportunity to have a true comprehension of what is learned through applying knowledge gained. That might look like going through a single chapter in a book, then having the time and patience towards applying that knowledge through hands on experience and with the help of instructors who specialize in what you are learning about. Every person learns in unique ways and at different paces so the learning would have to be accommodating of that.

 

Like with any art, it takes time and patience through experience to become skilled at that art. Reading a few books in an accelerated manner is not going to get you to that point. Through applying knowledge that is gained, one can gain more knowledge.

I agree. One of the biggest complaints that I have about this educational system is that we are all expected to "Fly" when we haven't even learned how to "Crawl." The school system never prioritizes building a solid foundation, which in turn causes massive problems down the road. 

 

 

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Hmmm, I know Michael has mentioned education moving more towards a role and/or choice based platform and I think @petra¬†linked to it above. I love the idea of that, and Michael said (paraphrasing), with practice we would be able to tell which role best represented a class in order to cater to the group. I think they also said that sages automatically feel more comfortable in a room with a bean bag chair or a stage.¬†I don‚Äôt have either of those in my classroom yet, but it seems like my ‚Äúsagier‚ÄĚ classes do best when they have space to perform. I thinking¬†of the student that stood up and announced, ‚Äúok, ok, now it‚Äôs my turn to share!‚ÄĚ - these are juniors in high school and¬†it was still so. cute.

 

Covid was a game changer for a lot of secondary school systems. Students definitely had a lot more autonomy from the lense of the school system, but often more responsibility at home. We blame the school system for a lot of things, but time for learning is protected when students actually have to come to school. 
 

Covid also proved that learning¬†is social, this is the idea that¬†students (everyone) benefit from being able to turn to a neighbor to discuss what‚Äôs happening in class. Scholars might be able to study reasonably well on their own, but pretty much everybody likes to talk out and share what they learned at some point (maybe especially scholars... ūüėÖ). It‚Äôs how we process new information.¬†
 

I have seen a greater emphasis on Carol Dweck‚Äôs ‚ÄúGrowth Mindset‚ÄĚ enter the zeitgeist in the last few years, and I think this is also an example of education in a mature world. This also relates to the grading system, which we‚Äôve spent so¬†much time discussing in professional development courses lately - the trouble is, to make grading on anything other than an A-F scale, we need 1.) a lower student to teacher ratio, and 2.) grade book software that actually supports alternative grading methods. Hopefully all that is coming ūü§ěūüŹľūü§ěūüŹľ

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Posted (edited)

@Patty¬†I loved reading your post! Thank you for the recommendation. I will check out Carol Dweck‚Äôs ‚ÄúGrowth Mindset.‚ÄĚ I once had a¬† teacher in elementary¬†whom I adored because she was very encouraging and had a piglet stuffy that all of us students enjoyed holding for a portion of a day. ¬†ūüėĀ

Edited by chamomile
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Something I've recently come across were some talks about childhood education. The idea was that around ages 8-9 through like 12 or so the child's brain is more apt to learn social skills so we shouldn't even bother teaching new information to them during these years and instead let them learn and focus on social skills. I'm trying to remember the individual I'm referencing, I'll have to look it up, but their suggestion was to just send the kids off to work on farms. That's taking it a little too far but I like the idea of teaching children important social skills at the most opportune stages of development. I can see that as being brought into focus in a mature soul paradigm.

Edited by Hunter
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Posted (edited)

@Patty What prompted my question was because I've always thought that there was something very wrong with me. After all, I have never enjoyed competing and do not see the merit in it.

 

  During elementary, my math teacher would make us call out our test mark, and if we didn't want to, we could go up to her desk and tell her. I have a friend who thinks that anything under a 97% is a fail. That's when I've started to question if there is more to it than just competition and cramming knowledge for the sake of a grade.

 

  What really hit home was when I helped a classmate out in math, and she tried very hard, I could tell, but in the end, I knew that she wouldn't be getting an A and that there would be no second chance.

 

  I've always loved learning and the joy mastering a concept brings me. My mindset is: if I fail, I will give it another try. If I didn't ace the test, then I'll bring it home to correct it. But we live in an environment where a mark can make or break us.

 

  We are told that it's okay to fail, but we are chastised for failing. We are told to ask questions, but we are just supposed to ask "Smart" questions. We are told to raise our hands when a question is proposed, but only a correct answer is allowed. You either do/get it right or don't even try. 

 

¬† So, seeing what education looks like in a Young Soul paradigm made me wonder¬†¬†how a mature paradigm might look like in comparison.ūüėĀ

 

¬†Please excuse the ranting and the terrible answer. I don't have the right choice of words¬†to paraphrase my thoughts into a good answer at the moment.ūüėÖ

Edited by chamomile
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@chamomile, in addition to what others have already shared, I would also recommend reading Alfie Kohn who is also a known proponent of progressive education.

 

https://www.alfiekohn.org/

 

I think as the current economic model also begins to change, we will see more progress and positive reforms in the educational field. Right now the system doesn't care about finding out where a student's strengths and talents are and then nurturing them not only because subjects are often taught pretty badly and rushed but also because there seems to be more emphasis put on maths, sciences (and languages where I'm at) rather than arts and humanities, etc. This way it would be hard for a student to know where he/she is leaning towards and may feel left out in some way without knowing why. The Young Soul Paradigm ranks the importance of some subjects over others as it is a hierarchial Soul Age. There are memes about Liberal Arts majors and how ''useless'' they are in comparison with the super respected STEM fields.

 

One of the reasons for that, I think, is that abilities in math and sciences are seen as more useful to many businesses because they can help create tangible things like technology that companies can then sell, then innovate more, sell more, etc.

 

The way I see it,  as the world transition away from capitalism and endless growth and production are no longer the main drive in the economy, a new apreciation for the currently left out fields may blossom and that would be reflected at schools.

 

Ironically, society's disregard for filelds like humanities and the qualities they embody and teach, is, I suspect, greatly contributing to the Truth crisis we have right now (with disinformation and fake news spreading fast, harmful conspiracy theories)  that has lead many to ignore and distrust science. For science to prosper and its solutions to be accepted and applied effectively, we need people to be better at sorting fact from fiction, to have crictical thinking and reading skills and a greater social responsibility which the current educational system either doesn't emphasize at all or just not enough, depending on where in the world you live.

 

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3 hours ago, chamomile said:

We are told that it's okay to fail, but we are chastised for failing. We are told to ask questions, but we are just supposed to ask "Smart" questions. We are told to raise our hands when a question is proposed, but only a correct answer is allowed. You either do/get it right or don't even try. 

 

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On 6/13/2021 at 4:04 AM, Marigold said:

@chamomile, in addition to what others have already shared, I would also recommend reading Alfie Kohn who is also a known proponent of progressive education.

 

https://www.alfiekohn.org/

 

I'm a fan of Kohn.  I often find his tweets insightful.  

 

On the subject of "mature soul education," I sense that mature soul education may include efforts that are influenced by the work of folks like Howard Zinn, Gloria Ladson-Billings, and Paulo Freire.

 

 

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