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Why Twelve (12) and Five (5) Are So Important in Michael Teachings


Delphi
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Twelve is the maximum number of spheres you can fit around a central sphere in 3 dimensions - and the points where they touch form the vertices of an icosahedron. Perhaps we have support circles of 12 because they are meant to empower us while we are physical - in other words, embedded in a three dimensional world.

 

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This is a result from the famous kissing sphere, or sphere packing problem - the densest packing of hyperspheres in any given dimension. Although, my theory could be wrong because we are all connected to higher dimensions.

 

An icosahedron has a FIVE - FOLD rotational symmetry. Michael has touched upon the importance of five but has never really provided us with a deep explanation as to why.  An excerpt: “And they are in beats that are Octaves and beats that involve the number 12 and the number nine and the number five.”

With five seeming to come in with organisation of life plans like 5-year plans, Clusters of 5 lives, it would make sense that rotational symmetry, or a variation in the arrangement of the 12 vertices or spheres, representing an anchoring structure whether on the physical plane or otherwise, would be five. Also, Michael has spoken on entity structures closely resembling C60 which of course is 5 times 20. But there has already been discussion of C60 on another thread so I won’t go into that here.


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The next connection I will draw between icosahedra and the structure of reality becomes truly fascinating. 
 

“A quasiperiodic crystal, or quasicrystal, is a structure that is ordered but not periodic. A quasicrystalline pattern can continuously fill all available space, but it lacks translational symmetry”. This, to mean seems like how all the planes up to the messianic would be structured, having order but never truly repeating in a predictable way. Quasicrystals, by the way have been found to exist in nature, and often seem to have icosahedral structure and fivefold symemtry, something almost never found in regular crystals. 

 

Aperiodic tiling is a two dimensional analog of this. “In 1976 Roger Penrose discovered a set of just two tiles, now referred to as Penrose tiles, that produced only non-periodic tilings of the plane. These tilings displayed instances of fivefold symmetry. ” 


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Examples of Penrose tiling. You can encode information in with them too (this is probably what is going on with lots of woven textiles and people’s trippy causal-plane like hallucinations).

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11042-020-09568-0

 

Interestingly, Penrose tilings are also a PROJECTION. 
 

“De Bruijn showed that Penrose tilings can be viewed as two-dimensional slices of five-dimensional hypercubic structures;[36] similarly, icosahedral quasicrystals in three dimensions are projected from a six-dimensional hypercubic lattice, as first described by Peter Kramer and Roberto Neri in 1984.[37]”


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In other words, there may be an intruiging connection between the presence of these tiles (and their 3d forms called Amman tilings which are found in quasicrystals) and higher dimensions - in other words a source of higher order - and likewise, if our ‘energy’ too takes a quasicrystalline form this too is also a shadow of much greater higher dimensional forms that may extend infinitely upwards.  

 


Bonus: Five is the FIFTH fibonacci number and the only fibonacci number to have itself as its place in the sequence apart from 1 which begins it.

 

The ratio between adjacent numbers in the Fibonacci sequence (1, 1, 2, 3, 5...) converge to the Golden Ratio, a very important number in nature.

 

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Phi = image.gif (by quadratic equation)

 

And here once again we have 5.

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Edited by Delphi
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