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What dictates what level of intelligence and unique talents/ abilities an individual has in a lifetime?


chamomile
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 Why is it that Some people are endowed with extraordinary talents ex: math genius, musical genius, while others seem to have none.  Why do some people seem to be blessed with genius-level intellect and seem to grasp concepts very quickly, while others don't? This is a question I have been pondering for years and was wondering what everyone else thinks. Thank you.

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I have been wondering this too but I have some guesses. I think different factors can play into this.

 

First of all, I think every Essence is capable of creating genius Personalities, although I suspect it may be more common to do so once an Essence has more experience like in the Mature and Old Ages. But I think they can exist in earlier lifetmes even though we may not recognize them as such from our current, more advanced perspectives. 

 

Prodigious people may look extraordinary to us, but they may be the culmination, so to speak, of many other lifetimes before them working to master certain skills and then continuously building upon them in one way or another and from different angles in various lifetimes until one day what we refer to ''genius'' is born. You don't, however, get to see the hard work or failure  of all those who came before that Personality. It kind of reminds me of viewing the amazing artwork of an old and experienced artist but when you see that finished painting on the wall, you just see the result of years of practice and it can be hard to imagine that even that artist had to start their journey somewhere by drawing basic shapes, shading or how to make a decent circle.

 

The standards of what a genius is can change with evolution and paradigms, as well.  For example, a prodigy Infant Soul may simply be someone who figures out how to create a survival shelter made of mud, sticks and rocks while for the Old Soul it could be about proving that consciousness exists with math equations. Both would be geniuses for and from different paradigms. I think that the Soul Age just determines the complexity of the achievements.

 

Another thing to consider is that while all Essences may be equally capable, some will naturally gravitate more towards certain themes and subjects and therefore have the opportunity to make discoveries and inventions in those areas one day while for other Essences other spheres may be of more interest to explore and learn about over the course of their lifetimes. So if  Essence 1 ends up overall being a better expert than Essence 2 at some area of knowledge even when both have cycled off, it will not be because Essence 1 is smarter or superior but because it was simply a greater area of focus in its Grand Cycle while physical. So, priorities.

 

And another reason for some genius lifetimes may also have to do with balancing Karma. For example, Steve Jobs, by creating Apple, was balancing Karma from a past lifetime and in this one in order to balance it, he needed to contribute in some big way to burn many of those ribbons. Now, personally, I wonder if he gained even more Karma in this lifetime due to many Apple products being made in developing countries, relying on cheap labour with bad working conditions, but that's another subject.

 

It's also important to note that many genius Personalities may never end up being seen as such by their peers, especially if they've never had the ability to polish their talents or when they've had to give up on refining their skills due to capitalism and getting a job that pays the bills. Not all get lucky to have people recognize their gifts, especially if they are more atypical, and have people invest in their education and further development.

 

The decision of when an Essence will have a genius Personality is different for everyone and I'm curious as to what circumstances prompt it. It's fun to speculate and ask questions though.

 

But ''regular'' Personalities can and do contribue a lot every day to the world (in science, art, entertainment, etc,), so they are not inferior. There is no such thing in fact, especially when you take reincarnation into consideration. Geniuses often use the knowledge of people who have done work before them, after all, and these are often just ''ordinary'', curious people. And, of course, it's important to point out that just because someone may seem intellectually blessed in a certain area of life, may be really stupid in another. You can be an engineering genius that can't tell fact from fiction and believes fake news and harmful conspiracy theories easily while someone ''regular'' may be much better at using their critical thinking to discern information.

 

 

Edited by Marigold
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I think it comes down to choice and what you want to learn. What does Essence want to experience, in collaboration with Personality, within a lifetime? After that is decided, all the rest is the designing of that lifetime which is a huge undertaking, especially as we age out as Souls. It can get quite elaborate over lifetimes. 

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I always thought it was just genetics, passion, and determination. After finding Michael's teaching, it seems much more intricate. @Marigold I agree with you there are many factors to consider in a lifetime; soul age/level, theme, overleaves, # previous cycles, task and etc.

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Oh good question! I have been wondering a lot too..
 

First of all, I think what we should question is, what is intelligence? How can we measure it, or can we actually measure it at all?
I think when we think of intelligence we mainly think of (academically) smart people who grasp things quickly. But there are other forms of intelligence that are often overseen, like emotional intelligence, or ‘street smart’ intelligence, creative intelligence.. (probably quite a few more but my (lack of) intelligence won’t allow me to access them at the moment lol).
 

I also personally think, EVERYONE has talents in some shape or form that we might just not be able to see, recognise or value, maybe because the person is disabled or can’t communicate in ways that we understand or for other reasons. Thinking of you, Stephen Hawkins, if he had been born 50 years earlier, we’d not been able to learn everything he had to teach.

But ultimately, I think we ALL bring something valuable to the table.
 

How we develop intelligence, I think, is not just genes but also the environment we grow up in, how we are being raised. Just think of Pablo Pineda, who became the worlds first person with Down Syndrome who gained a degree, thanks to the way his parents raised and treated him (like a not disabled person). Michael Jackson  surely was born with talent but probably would not have risen to such fame without his father (for better or worse.. :/). 

There is also a beautiful documentary called Alphabet, that basically asks a similar question, worth a watch:

 


On a soul level I can very well imagine that a lot of things play a role; life plan,  parents, genes, location, choice, centring and previous life experiences and I think some things are maybe just ‘by-products’ of life plans or simply down to luck or coincidence? 

 

I thought about Aurora a lot and her voice and wondered how many lifetimes practising she must have had to be able to sing like that 🙂

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"Genius" is most often a product of social mythologizing, IMO.  In many cases, it is simply a gloss society uses to put certain people on pedestals while erasing the structural conditions and contributions from others that made the so-called genius' accomplishments possible.  That's not to say there aren't people with remarkable talents and proficiencies, but most often, I think the difference between a "genius" and someone who's merely very good at something is down to the right help and the right circumstances at the right time.

Edited by Sam K
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I think it is a combination of genetics and environment. Someone with an intellectual disability was either born that way or suffered brain damage at some point. It would take work to improve learning outcomes. That said, I also think it has to do with what we value as a society. If we decided that people should excel at pumpkin chucking to do well in life then we would look for traits that would make someone successful at that task and reward that behavior. If we valued nonneurotypical behavior in people, then we would say those folks are talented geniuses or child prodigies and encourage them to succeed. Another example, as far as I know, spelling bees only really exist in english because spelling is a nightmare for english speakers so we value good spellers. (I am not one, btw) There are languages in which spelling is more uniform so not as hard. There's no need for a spelling bee. Anyone who's good at spelling in english probably just has a good memory. They got blessed with good memory genes. LOL 

 

It could very well be that child prodigies excelled at a task in previous lives. Or they're just really good learners. Who knows. 

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I want to add on to what @ckaricai noted and bring up that what one society considers “a genius talent” might not be so in another. I think that musical and artistic talents are more widely recognized and applauded than many others - painting, musical instruments, and body adornment like beads go way back to the Paleolithic and are cross-cultural. Still, there are societies like the Puritans which valued them less than most other groups.

 

Going back to some of the prehistoric fiction I love, Jean Auel’s Earth’s Children and Sue Harrison’s Carver trilogy - hunting was a talent in those societies that was vital to keeping everyone alive. Now, it’s mostly a sport, and not especially prized outside of sports circles. Same with being able to construct sturdy, warm clothing out of leather you tan yourself. Now, that is a very niche skill for hobbyists. Weaving baskets was once THE most highly prized skill among women of many Native American tribes, because that was what you cooked in, stored food in, carried babies in, basically those WERE your tools and every woman needed to make them. Now, basket making is still thought of as a talent, but it’s an artistic one for hobbyists and specialists. We go to Target or WalMart (or Sur Le Table if we can afford it, haha) to get our implements. Building our own homes? Used to be every woman knew how to build an earth lodge or tipi or other dwelling for her family. Having special expertise was a talent. Now…the city council will HATE you and ticket you if you tried building your own house in most places! Plus it’s hard work to build a really good one. We call in the pros and buy our houses or rent our apartments ready made.

 

Making music used to be what a lot more people did to pass cold winter nights and lend voice to festivals and rituals. Now we fire up our Spotify playlists and listen to a few people who are professionals. Or we go to the symphony. Or sing in the shower.

 

I think some talents (especially artistic) are more widely praised across time and space than others. While Ayla and her friends wouldn’t know what to do with a spelling bee champion, but they would highly value someone who knew how to make baskets, tan hides and make clothes from them, and hunt.

 

 

Edited by Crystal
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Experience (past life and present life), genetics, HEALTH, focus, passion, resources to support the flourishing of talent, degree of ‘awakeness’, willingness to fail and to play, luck and timing +communicative ability (to have their talent recognized)

Edited by Delphi
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6 hours ago, annali said:

Oh good question! I have been wondering a lot too..
 

First of all, I think what we should question is, what is intelligence? How can we measure it, or can we actually measure it at all?
I think when we think of intelligence we mainly think of (academically) smart people who grasp things quickly. But there are other forms of intelligence that are often overseen, like emotional intelligence, or ‘street smart’ intelligence, creative intelligence.. (probably quite a few more but my (lack of) intelligence won’t allow me to access them at the moment lol).
 

I also personally think, EVERYONE has talents in some shape or form that we might just not be able to see, recognise or value, maybe because the person is disabled or can’t communicate in ways that we understand or for other reasons. Thinking of you, Stephen Hawkins, if he had been born 50 years earlier, we’d not been able to learn everything he had to teach.

But ultimately, I think we ALL bring something valuable to the table.
 

How we develop intelligence, I think, is not just genes but also the environment we grow up in, how we are being raised. Just think of Pablo Pineda, who became the worlds first person with Down Syndrome who gained a degree, thanks to the way his parents raised and treated him (like a not disabled person). Michael Jackson  surely was born with talent but probably would not have risen to such fame without his father (for better or worse.. :/). 

There is also a beautiful documentary called Alphabet, that basically asks a similar question, worth a watch:

 


On a soul level I can very well imagine that a lot of things play a role; life plan,  parents, genes, location, choice, centring and previous life experiences and I think some things are maybe just ‘by-products’ of life plans or simply down to luck or coincidence? 

 

I thought about Aurora a lot and her voice and wondered how many lifetimes practising she must have had to be able to sing like that <img src=">

I love the trailer. Will read Pablo Pineda’s story, it sounds very remarkable.

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There are a wide array of specialties that people in our civilization can choose to focus on in a lifetime. Our societies tends to place a higher value on certain specialties over others. The truth is that what one person choose to experience and learn in a lifetime is as valid as what any other person chooses to experience and learn. There are many people who are very experienced and talented at what they do but what they are talented at is either not valued by civilization as a whole or they are not as well known as other people who are in the spotlight. I would say that by choosing to be alive and awake now and choosing to continue to move forward in a lifetime even if the path ahead is not clear is a continued contribution to the whole. Every experience counts whether one is considered a prodigy or not. From what I understand, Essence values the experiences of every lifetime and does not see lifetimes as a competition between one another. There may be some lifetimes where Essence feels more personified than others but all of it counts.

 

I would add that some if not many contributions are the result of a collective effort because in general, the combined experience of many can accomplish more than that of one person. At some point in the future, Elon Musk may be credited in historical records as the one who brought humanity to a multi-planetary state but the truth is that there were thousands of people who contributed to bringing that idea into reality (from the perspective of the future). I do not say this to discredit the work of Elon Musk as he is very knowledgeable across a broad range of areas but there are many others with unique experiences and skillsets who are contributing to the pieces of the puzzle.

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39 minutes ago, Jeroen said:

There are a wide array of specialties that people in our civilization can choose to focus on in a lifetime. Our societies tends to place a higher value on certain specialties over others. The truth is that what one person choose to experience and learn in a lifetime is as valid as what any other person chooses to experience and learn. There are many people who are very experienced and talented at what they do but what they are talented at is either not valued by civilization as a whole or they are not as well known as other people who are in the spotlight. I would say that by choosing to be alive and awake now and choosing to continue to move forward in a lifetime even if the path ahead is not clear is a continued contribution to the whole. Every experience counts whether one is considered a prodigy or not. From what I understand, Essence values the experiences of every lifetime and does not see lifetimes as a competition between one another. There may be some lifetimes where Essence feels more personified than others but all of it counts.

 

I would add that some if not many contributions are the result of a collective effort because in general, the combined experience of many can accomplish more than that of one person. At some point in the future, Elon Musk may be credited in historical records as the one who brought humanity to a multi-planetary state but the truth is that there were thousands of people who contributed to bringing that idea into reality (from the perspective of the future). I do not say this to discredit the work of Elon Musk as he is very knowledgeable across a broad range of areas but there are many others with unique experiences and skillsets who are contributing to the pieces of the puzzle.

Indeed, in history there is increasing attention placed on networks, great man histories have been out of fashion for a while.

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There are many different types of intelligence. Someone can be a genius but not have the soft skills or social intelligence that enables them to work with other people. 

The Model T car was invented and introduced to the world by Henry Ford and his Ford Motor Company. He was a brilliant inventor, yet someone called him an ignoramus.

 

“Henry Ford is heralded today as a technological genius, a brilliant capitalist, even a kind and generous moralist fighting for the rights and wages of commoners. He is often referred to as the inventor of the modern age…

 

Look again. The remarkable things you know about Ford are true. 

 

What you may not know is that during his lifetime, Henry Ford was famously ignorant. There was no end to what he didn’t know. He was revealed to be pathetically inarticulate and ill-informed. The stuff he didn’t know was amazing to people. He lived his entire life near Detroit, and showed little interest in the world outside the walls of his mind..."

 

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