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Harambe The Endangered Gorilla is Shot Dead [overleaves]


Troy
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Yet another animal imprisoned for Human entertainment was murdered because of the impossible situation created by Humans for another species. 

 

A 4-year old found a way through the bars of a gorilla enclosure and fell into the moat where the endangered Silver Back Gorilla who is known as "Harambe" quickly rushed to protect the child in the way a gorilla would protect a child. Out of fear for the child's safety, authorities quickly decided to go with fear and panic and just shoot the gorilla dead.

 

Most Gorillas are sentient like Humans and Cetaceans, so they have Essences and Overleaves like us.

 

Here are the overleaves of the gorilla who was murdered:

 

HARAMBE THE GORILLA

3rd Level Infant King with Server Casting, a Goal of Flow, Observation Mode, Idealist Attitude, Moving Center, Emotional Part, Chief Features of Stubbornness.

 

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I've wondered if this is part of what is playing out in the Divergence Nexus, at the national level anyway.

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7 minutes ago, Bobby said:

I've wondered if this is part of what is playing out in the Divergence Nexus, at the national level anyway.

@Bobby I was wondering the same thing, but the Nexus description is kind of vague or broad so I don't know. I'm noting it in the comments for the event listing.

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Even at the Infant Soul Age, you have to wonder with those overleaves - Flow, Observation, Idealist - if he would have purposefully hurt the little boy.

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8 minutes ago, Troy said:

@Bobby I was wondering the same thing, but the Nexus description is kind of vague or broad so I don't know. I'm noting it in the comments for the event listing.

 

True, but this may still apply:

 

PHOBIC OR FRIENDLY - As the emphasis on Phobia comes into greater effect, it may be important for you to note if you are falling into irrational fears, hyper-anxiety, over-thinking, plagued with speculation, panic, defense, etc. One of the easier ways for Phobia to shift is to look at where and how you can bring back your Friendliness. If you can help to foster Friendliness in your approaches, your navigation, your considerations, your cares, your methods, your communication, etc. the more you can move from restricted perspectives and into greater range of insight, choice, and kindness.

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I watched one of the videos, which you can see Harambe was holding the child's hand, at one point.  Of course, higher themes are being played out here, but with all the phobia going around, not many are actually studying the video.  Just hearing opposing extreme criticism of the event.  Some want to go after the mother, as far as getting Child Services after her.  No one is pointing any fingers at the Zoo, when they played a part into it too.  The Mature Soul era, it looks like, is not for the faint of heart.  :-(

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Wouldn't it be something if instead, the headlines read "Child falls into Gorilla enclosure... child shot dead so as not to cause further harm to the Gorilla..."

 

I mean, if there were an acknowledgement of Sentience in both species and clearly the Gorilla was not at fault, wouldn't this be a more "fair" conclusion if it had to be one or the other?

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Such a heart-breaking story.   Unfortunately, there is no way to know what the outcome would have been if they had taken the chance and not shot Harambe.  Was he trying to help?  Could he have been over-agitated- crying child, screaming crowd- and trying to pull the boy to safety?  If they hadn't shot the gorilla and the child died- even accidentally-  the "wrath of the gods" would would have descended on the Cincinnati Zoo.  They probably will still face a lawsuit over not having the necessary barriers so small kids can't slip through.

 

Last night I saw the trailer for this documentary coming soon:   http://www.unlockingthecagethefilm.com/    Definitely will have to see it- about the pros and cons of granting legal personhood to non-human species.  I think it's important to take a realistic view of primates as complex creatures capable of intelligent thought & communication- as well as EMOTION.  And fearful aggression is an emotion.  Hopefully we can re-evaluate how "nonhuman" animals are (mis)treated and strive for HUMANE treatment-  but not expect them to BE human.

Edited by Kerrin
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So sad.  Harambe looks confused, excited, unsure of what to do...and who can blame him?  He lived in a very regulated, routine oriented world in which little humans don't just stumble into like that.  It's clear that if he wanted to kill the boy, he could have very easily done so in the first 30 seconds.   As a silverback it was his "duty" to investigate this stranger, and regardless of what Harambe was really thinking, I see two innocent victims here.  Just so sad. 

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This is a sad event all around.  

 

I was curious about the boy's essence, as well, and I asked Michael for his info (Troy, did you get any info on the boy and the event in general?)...because I was amazed by how calm the boy seemed and the "energy" between Harambe and the boy.  I got that the boy is a 5th Old Sage-cast Warrior who was compelled by his mother's chief feature of impatience at the time he got into the enclosure.  He definitely got "in over his head" once he was in and facing the gorilla.  But his essence, of course, had anticipated this possibility and was quite curious and intrigued about the possible encounter with the gorilla.  I got that there was no karma created over the incident and that the gorilla and boy actually had moments of essence contact during the encounter.  

 

Who knows if this is accurate info or not, but there was definitely something about this event that speaks to me on a subtler level in the language of BEAUTY.

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1 hour ago, Nick Sweeney (Babylove) said:

I was curious about the boy's essence, as well, and I asked Michael for his info (Troy, did you get any info on the boy and the event in general?)...because I was amazed by how calm the boy seemed and the "energy" between Harambe and the boy.  

 

 

I didn't ask about the boy. Thanks for checking in on that. The boy was actually screaming, trying to get away, and seemingly terrified the whole time. I thought the same thing as you before I saw the unedited full video with sound where you can hear his high-pitched screams and see him try to scoot away in a tantrum-like kicking out of his legs. That makes it even more touching to me as to how kind and gentle the gorilla was for this screaming tiny creature who suddenly appeared in his world. 

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On 5/30/2016 at 9:47 AM, Troy said:

Most Gorillas are sentient

 

Just curious: when did it happen that we crossed the point when most gorillas are sentient? I thought the number of sentient gorillas was still low though growing. Maybe I've just been reading too many really old transcripts. 

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It's really sad and the whole incident is confusing and surreal. That it would be the phobia based event Michael mentioned seems fairly plausible to me.

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27 minutes ago, Janet said:

 

Just curious: when did it happen that we crossed the point when most gorillas are sentient? I thought the number of sentient gorillas was still low though growing. Maybe I've just been reading too many really old transcripts. 

My use of the word "most" may not have been accurate. I haven't asked for an updated number. In my mind I was thinking about Michael saying that Gorillas are Sentient and if we ruin it for them in this parallel, there will be parallels where the population continues to grow, so somewhere there is a "most."

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3rd level seems high based on some of the other material, this from 2010 has gorillas starting the experimentation 25 years before http://truthloveenergy.ning.com/forum/topics/gorilla-sentience

and this one has the number to around 24 fragments  in 2008 http://library.truthloveenergy.com/Michael-Teachings/other-species-ensoulment/

given lifetime length 35-40 years, and the number of lifetimes it tends to take to progress a level, something seems off.

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Ah, yes, Troy, I should have put the emphasis on "seemed" calm and also should have added "relatively!"  Perhaps what I was sensing was the gorilla's calm and gentle expression towards the boy...I'm mainly referring to the moment when the boy appears to be seated/squatting, facing Harambe, and then Harambe helps him up.  

 

But it is odd that there could be such gentleness and then the dragging.  The gorilla was obviously afraid and conflicted, and all the hysterical people above didn't help, I'm sure.

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12 hours ago, Nick Sweeney (Babylove) said:

I'm mainly referring to the moment when the boy appears to be seated/squatting, facing Harambe, and then Harambe helps him up.  

 

But it is odd that there could be such gentleness and then the dragging.  The gorilla was obviously afraid and conflicted, and all the hysterical people above didn't help, I'm sure.

I've read up some more on gorilla behavior and it turns out that the helping up and adjusting of the boy was an act of "display." Apparently dominant male gorillas will display their finds as a kind of aggression and pride, and the dragging is part of that display. As one gorilla expert noted, this would normally be a large branch or other fun find in nature, but it happened to be a boy this time. There was a real danger that this display would move toward swinging and smashing, which is what would happen with a big branch. Somehow this doesn't seem accurate to what we can see in the video, but I'm not an expert and I know how easy it is to project humanizing onto other creature behaviors (anthropomorphism), so I guess I trust the experts a bit on this. You are right that the screaming morons were only making things worse.

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This all sounds really similar to what Michael said about our own origins and the beginning of our sentience.

 

These animals should not be held in captivity. Period. In fact, I don't think any animal should be held in captivity. The only animals I know of that seem to deliberatly DECIDE and enjoy to live with humans, are dogs. The rest of them would pretty much prefer not to or would prefer to interact with us on a more uncommitted basis, whether we're talking pets or "livestock". 

 

 

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Nadine, you meant dogs *and* cats right ;)

 

The gorillas at Audubon Zoo seem to have some sentience.   They actually upset me. They always look incredibly bored and sad.

 

Now the Orangutans at Audubon are another story.   They are class clowns...they love playing with human things like cups, T-shirts and toys.  Yes, I said T-shirts.   One day I visited and one was in the process of dressing herself in a Saints shirt.  They are very animated and seem to enjoy the people.  

 

Once I was watching the female while eating ice cream.  She looked at me dead in the eyes and reached her hand out to me, silently "asking" me for ice cream.  I love her.  She's great with her baby too.  

 

Anyway, the look in her eyes had a LOT of depth.  It was a little surreal, because I'm not used to other animals looking at me like that.   If I could have shared my ice cream I would have for sure :)

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On June 1, 2016 at 7:21 AM, Troy said:

I've read up some more on gorilla behavior and it turns out that the helping up and adjusting of the boy was an act of "display." Apparently dominant male gorillas will display their finds as a kind of aggression and pride, and the dragging is part of that display. As one gorilla expert noted, this would normally be a large branch or other fun find in nature, but it happened to be a boy this time. There was a real danger that this display would move toward swinging and smashing, which is what would happen with a big branch. Somehow this doesn't seem accurate to what we can see in the video, but I'm not an expert and I know how easy it is to project humanizing onto other creature behaviors (anthropomorphism), so I guess I trust the experts a bit on this. You are right that the screaming morons were only making things worse.

 

 

This makes sense. I was wondering what the experts thought of the behavior.

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4 hours ago, Erin said:

This makes sense. I was wondering what the experts thought of the behavior.

 

 

I spoke too soon when I wrote that reply to @Nick Sweeney (Babylove) because then I read several more professional perspectives that swore the gorilla showed no behaviors that indicated aggressiveness or display. So I have no idea. When professionals are in such disagreement, we are left with only our own perspectives. For me, whether he was being aggressive or panicked or kind and in control, my heart and gut tell me this could have been resolved without anyone being hurt or killed if Humans hadn't freaked out as usual. 

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On 6/1/2016 at 5:57 AM, Nadine said:

This all sounds really similar to what Michael said about our own origins and the beginning of our sentience.

 

These animals should not be held in captivity. Period. In fact, I don't think any animal should be held in captivity. The only animals I know of that seem to deliberatly DECIDE and enjoy to live with humans, are dogs. The rest of them would pretty much prefer not to or would prefer to interact with us on a more uncommitted basis, whether we're talking pets or "livestock". 

 

 

 

Dogs and cats! I like dogs, but, like kids, I like 'em better when they belong to other people! I am sure my cats are happy living with me, even if it's just that I'm a never-ending cornucopia of food, pets, and soft places to sleep. 

 

There are other species that are primarily domesticated and, I think, are happy to be pets - ferrets, rats, betta fish, those are three I can think of. But, I agree with you when it comes to wild animals. Especially for the intelligent ones like elephants, gorillas, big cats, etc. I wonder if any captive condition can be truly called humane.

 

Maybe the divergence has to do with questioning the value of zoos (among other things)? As it is, circuses are phasing out their elephant exhibits.

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1 hour ago, Crystal said:

 

Dogs and cats! I like dogs, but, like kids, I like 'em better when they belong to other people! I am sure my cats are happy living with me, even if it's just that I'm a never-ending cornucopia of food, pets, and soft places to sleep. 

 

There are other species that are primarily domesticated and, I think, are happy to be pets - ferrets, rats, betta fish, those are three I can think of. But, I agree with you when it comes to wild animals. Especially for the intelligent ones like elephants, gorillas, big cats, etc. I wonder if any captive condition can be truly called humane.

 

Maybe the divergence has to do with questioning the value of zoos (among other things)? As it is, circuses are phasing out their elephant exhibits.

 

Crytal, I don't think rodents, birds, reptiles or fish should be kept as pets in a house or in an apartment - there is no way you can reproduce adequate living conditions for them. Some of them might be gentle, tame and have a loving relationship with their owners, just like a gorilla in a zoo does with his/her keeper. Kind of a "Stockholm Syndrome". I guess every living creature has the urge to form some kind of bonding - but you're still depriving an animal of adequate living conditions and freedom. Now, that's of course just my opinion, so I hope you don't feel offended by it. You might be right about the rats though. I've seen them living with homeless punks on the streets and they were indeed very attached to them, without any urge to get away.

 

I didn't include cats because they generally don't have "committed" relationships with their owners. In all the years of domesticating cats, they still managed to not get too entangled with humans. When living with somebody it's usually their choice to stay. A cat who doesn't like you will make your life a living hell. ;)

 

 

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